Weed Seed Won’t Germinate

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If your Marijuana seeds won't germinate and you are wondering why, it's probably due to one of these 4 reasons, here is how to fix it and some useful tips. I'm a first time grower having trouble with germinating my seeds. The seeds crack and start showing the tap root then stop growing after that point. How… Germinating weed seeds is the essential first step in growing. We show 5 methods how to germinate weed seeds, including our method with 99% success rate !

Why Won’t My Marijuana Seeds Germinate

So, you have tried germinating your marijuana seeds, unsuccessfully. You might have tried using water, soil, peat, paper towel, or one of several other methods out there, but your seeds still did germinate and grow into a huge kush plant as you hoped. What the heck is going on here? (we recommend ILGM for quality seeds)

Well, there are various reasons why your marijuana seed won’t germinate. Marijuana seeds need pretty specific care and conditions to germinate properly. There could be a problem with too little or too much moisture, the wrong temperature, the weed seed could just be a dud, or there might be another problem too.

Let’s take a closer look at this issue of your weed seeds not germinating. Why won’t my marijuana seeds germinate?

Why Seed Germination Is Essential

Remember guys, all seeds need to be germinated, not just weed seeds. Of course, in nature, this often happens on its own, but if you want to grow your own marijuana plants, you will to germinate them manually. Seed germination is the act of bringing the seed to life.

By supplying it with some moisture and the right conditions, you are causing the interior of the seed to eat through its food, use up that glucose, crack through the shell, and become a little plant sprout.

Just think of it like the sprout being the yolk of the egg, which will grow into a chick, when it eats the egg white or food, which in the case of a weed seed, is the glucose stored inside of it.

A weed seed is not all that much different from a chicken egg waiting to hatch.

Why Won’t My Weed Seeds Germinate? (Using Paper Towel, Peat, or Water As The Medium)

There are in fact several reasons why your weed seeds might not be germinating. Some of these issues are caused by the people doing the germinating, and some simply cannot be helped.

Why are my weed seeds not germinating when I am using paper towel, peat, or water as the germination medium?

1. The Seeds Are Dead Ducks

The first reason why your weed seeds may not be germinating is simply because they are bad seeds. When you get weed with seeds in it, or you purchase seeds, they should look a certain way.

Generally speaking, a healthy marijuana seed is going to be a moderate to dark green in color, and should be fairly round.

If you have a weed seed that is really flat and/or light green or super pale in color, it probably won’t ever germinate. Sometimes seeds are just no good. It happens and there is nothing you can do about this.

However, on the other hand, your seeds might have been good at one point, but were then improperly stored.

Weed seeds need to be kept in a cool and dark environment until it is time for germination. If the weed seeds are not properly stored, they will degrade, die, and they will not germinate

2. Not Enough or Too Much Moisture

Another reason why your marijuana seeds might not be germinating is due to issues with moisture. For one, a lot of people end up drowning their weed seeds outright.

Yes, some people germinate their weed seeds in nothing else but water, but this tends to not have the best success rate, and it is because the seeds end up drowning.

This can also happen if you use soil, paper towel, or peat for germination. It’s not too difficult to drown them, so spritz them with enough water to be moist, but there should not be any dripping going on. Too much water can actually rot your seed outright.

On the other hand, if the weed seeds are too dry, and your germination medium is too dry, the seeds just won’t get enough water to germinate.

Water is an essential part of marijuana seed germination, and without it, nothing is going to happen.

3. Too Much Light

Now, this is not always the case, but generally speaking, germination needs to happen in a dark environment.

If your weed seeds are getting way too much light, there is a chance that they will not germinate. Like we said, this is not always the case, but it can definitely be a contributing factor.

However, what is interesting is that as soon as the seeds pop open, they can do fine with some light, but just not too much.

There is a really fine line here and it can be hard to gauge. It does somewhat depend on the quality of the seed in question.

4. Temperature & Humidity Issues

Your marijuana seeds need a specific level of temperature and humidity in order to germinate properly, or to germinate at all.

Whatever germination medium you are using, whether water, peat, or paper towel, the temperature needs to be a steady 26 to 28 degrees.

Any hotter or colder than that, and the seeds probably won’t germinate. On that same note, a 70% humidity level is what you are aiming for.

If you are off by too much with either of these factors, the seeds aren’t going to pop open and come to life.

Why Won’t My Pot Seeds Germinate? (Using Soil As A Germination Medium)

Now, although we do not recommend using soil as your germination medium, many people go this way.

Of course, using soil as the medium has the benefit that your seed pops and sprouts in the same place you want it to grow, therefore eliminating the need to transfer the seed from the germination medium into the soil.

However, there are some problems that can arise when using soil for weed seed germination. Keep in mind that some people do plant their seeds directly in the dirt without first germinating them, but this is not a great idea and often results in failure.

Germinating a marijuana seed right in the soil is actually pretty hard and is not recommended. Why won’t my weed seeds germinate when using soil as the medium?

1. You Planted Them Too Deep

One reason why your weed seed might not have germinated in soil is because you planted it way too deep. What is interesting about planting your seed directly in soil for germination, is that it will need a bit of sunlight.

This is because when germinating directly in soil, the seed needs to both germinate and then be able to sprout and grow up past the dirt.

The issue here is that yes, a weed seed needs to have relative dark to germinate, but then needs light in order to grow through the dirt and sprout of the top.

If you bury the seed too deep, once it does open up, the sunlight won’t be able to reach it, and the sprout will therefore quickly die.

So, without just a bit of light, even if the seed does germinate in soil, it still won’t grow up past the dirt.

2. The Soil Has Mold, Fungus, or Insects

Ok, so mold, fungus, and insects of all sorts can easily kill a weed plant in just a couple of weeks. This is a big problem which many growers face, especially indoor growers.

See also  Outdoor Marijuana Seeds

Simply put, if the soil you are using for seed germination has any trace of mold, fungus, or burrowing insects, your seed will most likely die.

It probably won’t ever open up and sprout. However, on the off chance that it does still somehow germinate, it probably won’t live long enough to grow and sprout up past the surface of the soil.

3. The Soil Loaded With Too Much Fertilizer

Perhaps the biggest and most common issue that arises when attempting to germinate your weed seeds in soil is that the soil has too much fertilizer.

Yes, your weed plants will need some fertilizer and nutrients as they grow, but the young sprouts and seeds are extremely delicate.

Generally speaking, even small amounts of fertilizer can burn, destroy, and kill both the seed and the sprout.

4. Other Issues

  1. Moisture & Temperature – Once again, you might have drowned the weed seed in too much water. On the other hand, if you have not supplied enough moisture, just add some into the soil, and the seed may still germinate.
  2. Seed Quality – Whether you are using soil or any other medium, the seed may still just be defective on its own.
  3. Packing Down Too Hard – Now, packing the soil down on top of the seed should be done very lightly. Once the seed goes to germinate, if the soil is packed too tightly, it can prevent the seed from opening up, and if it does open up, the sprout might not be able to force its way up through the tightly packed soil.

Weed Seed Germination – A Quick Guide & Tips

Let’s just very quickly give you a couple marijuana seed germination tips for a fast step by step process.

    you want to grow and get some seeds, ensuring that they are fairly round and a good, dark green in color.
  • Choose your germination medium, which can be paper towel, water, soil, peat pellets, or similar things to peat pellets.
  • Insert the soil into the medium, ensuring that the temperate is steadily around 27 degrees, with a humidity level of 70%, and place this in the dark. for the seed to germinate. Do not wait for longer than a day after the seed has cracked and the first sprout has started to come out to plant it.(if you have not used soil as the germination medium). Waiting too long to plant a germinated seed in soil can cause it to die.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are a number of factors which can affect weed seed germination, with there being a good few issues that can cause them to not germinate. It should be a fairly easy process, but there are some things that can get in the way. We would recommend using peat pellets or the paper towel method for this, as both soil and water as germination mediums usually don’t work too well.

Fabian

My passion for the sticky icky started nearly a decade ago, and it all began when I first laid my eyes on the beauty that is the marijuana plant.

I cover all aspects of growing from equipment recommendations to plant health/care tips to help both new and experienced growers.

seeds won’t germinate properly

I’m a first time grower having trouble with germinating my seeds.
The seeds crack and start showing the tap root then stop growing after that point.

How i germinate.

soak seeds in water for 24 hours
then transfer to a damp paper towel, cover it between two plates leaving room for air to get in.
I place the seeds in a warm drawer around 80F to 85 F. i live in a warm climate year around but can’t put them outside .

after two days the seeds crack and start showing tap roots from this point on the roots never grow any further no mater how long i wait. i would check on them every day at least once to make sure the paper towel is still damp and i try not to touch the seeds at all or move them around.

any ideas why my seeds are not going past this stage? any advice will be appreciated.

Lordhooha
Well-Known Member

I’m a first time grower having trouble with germinating my seeds.
The seeds crack and start showing the tap root then stop growing after that point.

How i germinate.

soak seeds in water for 24 hours
then transfer to a damp paper towel, cover it between two plates leaving room for air to get in.
I place the seeds in a warm drawer around 80F to 85 F. i live in a warm climate year around but can’t put them outside .

after two days the seeds crack and start showing tap roots from this point on the roots never grow any further no mater how long i wait. i would check on them every day at least once to make sure the paper towel is still damp and i try not to touch the seeds at all or move them around.

any ideas why my seeds are not going past this stage? any advice will be appreciated.

Burpee 36 cell self watering seed starter it’s all I use whether I’m doing hydro or dirt I just change my medium depending on which room I’m starting up. I stay away from all the other unnessary methods.

markyboy45
Member

Burpee 36 cell self watering seed starter it’s all I use whether I’m doing hydro or dirt I just change my medium depending on which room I’m starting up. I stay away from all the other unnessary methods.

whitebb2727
Well-Known Member

Quit screwing around with extra steps. Get a small pot or solo cup and poke holes in the bottom. Fill with soil. Put seed in soil and lightly water and leave it alone until it sprouts.

markyboy45
Member

Quit screwing around with extra steps. Get a small pot or solo cup and poke holes in the bottom. Fill with soil. Put seed in soil and lightly water and leave it alone until it sprouts.

raggyb
Well-Known Member

Once tap root shows you can put tap root down in soil with top slightly covered and water. You don’t have to wait. it’s a weed so it’s going to grow, cant let it dry out but don’t over water. But the seed starter is even better.

Budzbuddha
Well-Known Member

@whitebb2727 is on target . Although there is 1000 ways to pop a seed , basics are easier than multiple steps.

It’s a seed for gods sake . Planting in a cup of soil ( 1/8″ down ) – light mix if possible .
There ARE bagged mixes that are a bit harsh on young seedlings. So a ” starter mix ” or something similar would work. I mist the soil ONLY to dampen , not soak . Solo or styrofoam cups will get you started , I use styro because it makes it easy to RELEASE the plug without too much stress before I transplant.

I do use a seedling mat for warmth ( because of low 60° weather lately ) but if ambient temps are a comfortable 70°ish or so inside the house , you are ok.

An ” Alternative ” is that I soak seed or seeds in a lukewarm shot glass of water for about
6 hours to hydrate seed . I do not let seed stay long in the water , just to hydrate , then plant in soil. You can also plant directly into a container ( 3 gallon or whatever you are using ) of soil. Young baby plants love warmth so that’s all you should be concerned with.

Once they get their ” legs ” I move the girls to the bigger lights. Seriously you could toss a handful in the yard and they would pretty much take.

markyboy45
Member

@whitebb2727 is on target . Although there is 1000 ways to pop a seed , basics are easier than multiple steps.

See also  Cannabis Seeds Canada

It’s a seed for gods sake . Planting in a cup of soil ( 1/8″ down ) – light mix if possible .
There ARE bagged mixes that are a bit harsh on young seedlings. So a ” starter mix ” or something similar would work. I mist the soil ONLY to dampen , not soak . Solo or styrofoam cups will get you started , I use styro because it makes it easy to RELEASE the plug without too much stress before I transplant.

I do use a seedling mat for warmth ( because of low 60° weather lately ) but if ambient temps are a comfortable 70°ish or so inside the house , you are ok.

An ” Alternative ” is that I soak seed or seeds in a lukewarm shot glass of water for about
6 hours to hydrate seed . I do not let seed stay long in the water , just to hydrate , then plant in soil. You can also plant directly into a container ( 3 gallon or whatever you are using ) of soil. Young baby plants love warmth so that’s all you should be concerned with.

Once they get their ” legs ” I move the girls to the bigger lights. Seriously you could toss a handful in the yard and they would pretty much take.

How to Germinate Weed Seeds
(99,9% Success Rate)

This is the complete guide on how to germinate weed seeds.

In today’s guide you’ll learn:

  • What germination is
  • 5 methods how to germinate your seeds
  • How long the process takes
  • Common mistakes
  • Lots more

In short: if you want to learn successfully germinate your precious marijuana seeds, you’ll love this new guide.

Don’t have time to read the guide right now?

No worries. Let me send you a copy so you can read it when it’s convenient for you. Just let me know where to send it (Takes only 5 seconds).

  • Don’t learn it the hardway
  • What is germination, anyway?
  • Germinating weed seeds
  • Germinate weed seeds: get the basics right
  • Germination methods
  • How long does the germination process take?
  • When can I pot my seedlings?
  • Common germination mistakes
  • Germinate away

Don’t Learn it the Hardway

A long time ago, as first-time growers, we had no idea what we were doing. It was overwhelming and tempting to skip over this first phase; we were excited for the result, after all.

We had to learn the hard way, but a high-quality seed is only as good as the growing circumstances and the environment you provide.

The germination process is where it all begins.

It turns out that germinating weed seeds isn’t all that difficult.

With a little know-how and preparations, you’ll be well on your way to being a successful parent to a little seedling.

In a hurry today?

Let’s start with a tip:

Shortcut to 99,9% Succes Rate

You are here for a quick answer.

Want to know what Germination Method our Seed Breeders use?

Ps. Read the rest of this guide later: we share our growth hack!

What Is Germination, Anyway?

Once you’ve planted a weed seed, it goes through a period of dormancy. When the seed splits or shows a root, this indicates successful germination. This occurs under specific conditions that involve:

  • Light.
  • Water.
  • Oxygen.
  • Temperature control.

How successful the germination process is depends on the conditions mentioned above. For example, if there’s not enough water, the seed won’t germinate.

Conversely, too much water can virtually drown the seed by restricting its access to oxygen.

When the needs of the seed (see what we did there?) are met, the first thing it does is take in oxygen and water. Its coating will break, or pop, open and a root will emerge.

A single plant shoot then appears to finalize the process.

Such a simple process! Once you have the basics down, you’re ready to tackle that first seed.

Germinating Weed Seeds

From seed to harvest, a marijuana species go through a specific set of steps that ensure a fruitful result.

In brief, they are:

Indoor

  1. Choosing your seed.
  2. Germination: 3-7 days.
  3. Vegetative: 1-2 weeks.
  4. Flowering: 8-11 weeks.
  5. Harvesting/drying: 1-3 weeks.

Outdoor

  1. Choosing your seed.
  2. Germination: 3-7 days.
  3. Seedling: 2-3 weeks.
  4. Vegetative: 3-16 weeks.
  5. Flowering: 8-11 weeks.
  6. Harvesting/drying: 1-3 weeks.

On average, the entire process takes around 3–5 months, sometimes longer, depending on the species and if you’re growing indoors or out. The latter tends to take more time, given the conditions are much less controllable.

Germinate Weed Seeds: Get the Basics Right

Nailing the basics sets you up for a good grow and successful germination from the get-go. One of our primary concerns here is the quality of seed.

What makes a premium weed seed?

  • Color: The best weed seeds will be light to dark brown. Green seeds indicate they were harvested early and/or contain no embryo inside — useless!
  • Texture: Look for seeds that are hard to the touch. Soft, squishy ones indicate they’re not ready for planting.
  • Storage: Any seeds you purchase should be kept at a temperature of around 71-77 ℉ /21-25 ℃

In regards to other conditions, lighting won’t be such an issue just yet, as germinated seeds won’t require it until the root has popped and the first plant shoot has appeared.

You may be wondering if size plays a role as well?

As tempting as it may be to assume the seed’s size is equivalent to how large the plant will be, don’t do it.

For example, a small Sativa seed might turn into a monstrous species once grown.

Germination Methods

Now for the juicy stuff! Today, we focus on five different options to choose from, depending on your needs and available resources:

  • Glass of water.
  • Wet towel.
  • Directly in soil.
  • Stone wool blocks.
  • Using the Spongepot starter kit.

Method 1: Glass of Water

Also referred to as “pre-germination,” this method involves soaking the seeds in water. It’s used particularly for older seeds to try and “wake” them up.

  1. Soak the seeds: Soak your seeds in lukewarm, chlorine-free water overnight.
  2. Float or sink: Seeds that initially float show better chances of surviving.
  3. Check for germination: You’ll see that a white root has “popped” or germinated. This should happen within 1 to 3 days.
  4. Retrieve your seeds: Gently remove the seed and dry it on a kitchen towel.


Pros

  • May be able to revive old seeds

Cons

  • Risky
  • Should only be attempted with seeds that might die otherwise.
  • despite 1 to 3 days being the norm on average, in practice, this can sometimes take up to 7 days.

Method 2: Wet Towel

Similar to the method above, using a wet towel is another pre-germination method.

  1. Wet a paper towel: Do so until it’s completely covered but not dripping.
  2. Fold your seeds inside: Tuck your seeds into the paper towel securely.
  3. Plate it: Place the towel on a paper plate with another plate on top.
  4. Leave in a warm place: Leave for at least a day and up to a week, checking periodically for any popping.

Pros

  • Old seeds might have a chance here.

Cons

  • Seeds may suffer from a lack of oxygen.
  • Mold and mildew might show up.
  • Seeds can become too nimble for a successful transplant.

Method 3: Directly in Soil

This sounds like a more natural method to use. because it is! No fooling around with pre-germination tricks, here:

  1. Use an 8-10 cm/ 3-4 inch pot: Take your pot and fill with seed and cutting soil. Press down.
  2. Make a hole: Use a narrow, pointy object to make a 3-5mm/ 0.20 inch hole in the middle.
  3. Put the seed inside: Place it gently in the hole.
  4. Use chlorine-free water: The soil should be moist but not overly saturated.
  5. Place in a proper location: Find a warm enough area for the seeds to rest.
  6. Find balanced temperature: Too cold and the seeds won’t budge, but too hot and they might dry out. If you’re in a cooler climate, use lighting for warmth. As recommended earlier, 71–77 ℉ /21-25 ℃ is ideal.
  7. Wait three days: It will take, on average, between 3 and 7 days for germination.

Pros

  • Mimics a natural setting.
  • Requires little equipment.

Cons

  • Takes a bit of a green thumb.

Method 4: Stone Wool Blocks

These are the little blocks you’ve probably seen at your local garden shop; nicely organized and packaged for root cuttings and germinating seeds. They’re also perfectly suitable for weed seeds!

  1. Immerse the cubes: Cover them with water with a pH of 5.6–5.8.
  2. Gently squeeze: Do this to wring out any excess water.
  3. Place the seeds: Plant the seeds horizontally within the pre-formed hole.
  4. Cover the hole: Use an extra piece of the soft wool to do this. Make sure it’s not packed too tightly, in order for oxygen to reach the seed.
  5. Choose a warm location: Use the temperature range listed under the soil method above.
  6. Water the cubes: With the same pH as stated in step one, water every 1 to 2 days.
  7. Wait three days: It should take around 3 to 5 for germination to occur.


Pros

  • Similar to a natural process.
  • Easy-to-find supplies.

Cons

  • Cubes may harbor moisture, leading to dead seeds.

Method 5: Using a Starter Kit

A starter kit is a convenient method that gives you everything you need for successful germination. With the Spongepot, you’ll receive a package of 20, 48 or 96 pots to get you started.

The instructions are, more or less, foolproof:

  1. Put supplied bacteria in water: Dissolve the bacteria in a liter of water.
  2. Water the Spongepots: Use the bacteria-water to water the provided Spongepots.
  3. Drain: Drain away any excess water that accumulates in the process.
  4. Plant seeds: Plant one seed per pot, about 3-5 mm/ 0.20 inch deep.
  5. Maintain temperature: Place the Spongepots in a place between 71 and 77 ℉ / 21-25 ℃
  6. Time to wait: Seeds should germinate between 3 and 7 days later.
  7. Transplant the seeds: Once the seeds finish, you can transplant them to their pot to begin their seedling phase.


Pros

  • Easy to use.
  • Includes a soil enhancer.
  • Organic soil mixture with useful fungi.
  • Promotes healthy roots.

Cons

  • Only available through online order.

We at Marijuana Seed Breeders not only care about your seeds but the success of their germination. This gemination method is our favorite! It gives us the highest success rate.

You can see how to germinate with Spongepot in the video below or on the Spongepot product page.

How Long Does the Germination Process Take?

From start to finish, the germination process can take anywhere between 1 and 7 days.

Note that this is an average and the actual time frame depends on the individual seed quality and the growing conditions we discussed earlier.

For example, is the seed large or older? Maybe the temperature is a bit cooler? Seeds with these conditions may take up to more than a week to pop.

Seeds in the ideal temperature range should germinate within a week, maximum.

When Can I Pot My Seedlings?

We understand your predicament. You want to take the best care possible but, at the same time, you don’t want to become impatient and risk the entire process.

The good news is that it doesn’t take long! Once the seeds have popped and you see that root coming through, it’s time to pot your seedlings.

This, of course, will depend on the method you’ve used, but also the state of the seed from the beginning.

Generally speaking, you’ll be ready to do this anywhere between 3 and 10 days after the start of the germination process.

Once your newly-germinated seeds are ready to go in their special medium, you will continue looking over the seedling phase from there.

Depending on the size of your plant, you may need to switch to a larger pot at some point during the process. If this isn’t done, you could experience something called “root bound,” which means the rooting system has grown beyond the pot.

How to tell? Here are some signs:

  • The new growth is fragile and weak-looking.
  • There’s discoloration on the stem.
  • May appear to be underwatered.

Another distinguishing trait to look out for that may indicate your plant is ready for a new pot includes how many leaves your plant has. On average, when plants have around four to five sets of leaves, it’s time for a transplant.

Common Germination Mistakes

When it comes to growing cannabis, there’s a slew of common mistakes that could stop you from achieving a successful grow. More specific to germination, pay attention to:

  • Leaving seeds for too long.
  • Incorrect planting methods.

Leaving Seeds for Too Long

Overestimating your seed’s germination needs could leave you with duds in the end. This is usually the case with pre-germination methods mentioned above, such as the cup or paper towel method.

Leaving your seeds for too long could result in overly sensitive roots that are easily damaged in the transplant process.

Avoid this mistake by transplanting your seeds when the root is approximately one to two centimeters in length.

This ensures the roots are stable but not overly saturated and prone to damage.

Incorrect Planting Methods

We see mistakes being made when it comes to the “two D’s” of direction and depth.

Direction

Placing the seed in its planting medium may seem like an overly simple task. However, there’s still a chance you could screw it up.

Avoid planting it in the wrong direction by paying attention to the seed’s crown.

This looks like a small crater shape located at one end of the seed. The other end has a point, so they’re easy to distinguish from one another.

Make sure that the seed’s crown is facing you when you plant it, which leaves the pointy end facing downward.

This way, when the seed germinates, it’ll sprout properly, sending the root down versus the opposite scenario of resulting in a failed seedling.

Depth

The planting depth matters, too. This will differ depending on the type of seed you’re planting and the medium it’s going in.

Generally speaking, we want to avoid planting seeds too deep, which could result in a seedling never showing up.

The opposite of this, planting too shallow, may also pose a problem. Doing so could result in weak plant stems that may not allow the seedling to grow.

Avoid either scenario by aiming for about 3-5 mm/ 0.1- 0.2inch in depth when you plant.

Germinate Away

As you can see, germinating weed seeds is a basic procedure that if done with a little care and forethought, should be a successful one.

Have a designated location ready that’s warm but not too hot. If you live in a cool climate, use lights for warmth, and make sure your germinating seeds stay wet but not saturated.

It might be tempting to use a pre-germination method, such as the cup or paper towel, but we recommend avoiding these as much as possible.

Using a starter kit, instead, will enable you to have high-quality resources at your fingertips that cover you from A to Z

Pay attention to any root growth or “popping” to indicate germination is complete.

By following our guidelines, you’ll be transplanting your baby plants in no time.

Jennifer

I have a passion for nutrition, organic supplements, and (mental) health. After learning about the beneficial properties of marijuana, I dedicated myself to writing articles that will teach you everything there is to learn about this miraculous plant. I’m looking forward to sharing with people how they can incorporate the benefits of marijuana into their healthy lifestyle: you don’t have to smoke to consume marijuana.

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