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use distilled water on marijuana seeds

Dumb question? distilled water?

yes DI water is 7.0. (technically, but t varies!) It is also useless for any living organism as there is no ionic content in it to transfer electrolytes.

*It has no use unless nutrients are added.

AluminumMonster
Duke of Errl:)
The Hemp Goddess
Granny

No, distilled water will not have a constant or standard pH. What it will have is zero dissolved solids.

Until you are feeding your plants, pH should not be a concern especially if you are using distilled water.

OGKushman
Needs More Cowbell

not sure if i explained that perfectly. but it sounds right.
PH in DI should be 7.0 exactly. Other external factors contribute to the change (bottle, atmosphere. etc)

And do not use distilled water for any reason. Unless your flushing. You are starving your plants of food and leeching any and all nutrients out of the soil.

PPM of ZERO is completly useless. What made you want to feed it to your plants? Your feeding them condensed "steam".

The Hemp Goddess
Granny
OGKushman
Needs More Cowbell

well that would be good compared to no dissolved solids. At least his plants would see some micro like cal, mag, moly, boron, etc. It definately would be better the DI h2o for a young plant needing nutes.

but like i said i dont do soil. I start with inert Oppm medium and I add every nutrient.

Bleek187
higher than captain kirk
Just a Dawg

No, distilled water will not have a constant or standard pH. What it will have is zero dissolved solids.

Until you are feeding your plants, pH should not be a concern especially if you are using distilled water.

actually distilled should have a stable PH of neutral 7. Depends on how pure it’s distilled. The jugs out of the grocery store may vary a little bit.
double distilled water is pure PH7. Pharmaceutical grade.

The problem with using distilled is the lack of minerals, micro-nutrients, and other ions. that are beneficial to plants. but if your tap water is junk go with spring water
I only use distilled in myco never in my grow.

Oldtyme
Well-Known Member

I’m curious too what my well water PPM is so I’ll check it tonight while I’m waiting to start another grow.
I say that. because I’ve tinkered around with 1 plant & 1 150w HPS. giving them nothing but plain old water & my last two plants put out some impressive product.
Sometimes I think the ‘scientists’ forget it’s only a weed

*disclaimer: I am going to do it "right" this time. : )

Wetdog
Old Droopy Dog

yes DI water is 7.0. (technically, but t varies!) It is also useless for any living organism as there is no ionic content in it to transfer electrolytes.

*It has no use unless nutrients are added.

Distilled or RO for hydro only, not soil.

OG is quite correct AFA it being useless for any living organism.

At the least, mix it with tap water, or use spring water.

Just a Dawg
hero4u2b
Well-Known Member
BBFan
Days of Wine and. Roses

yes DI water is 7.0. (technically, but t varies!) It is also useless for any living organism as there is no ionic content in it to transfer electrolytes.

*It has no use unless nutrients are added.

Is all distilled water also de-ionized (DI)? No, it’s a different process I thought.

As far as distilled water being useless- where does this information come from? I would like to read more about this.

Once you pour it into the soil, doesn’t it change?

When you add nutrients to it, doesn’t it change?

Jericho
Well-Known Member

Is all distilled water also de-ionized (DI)? No, it’s a different process I thought.

As far as distilled water being useless- where does this information come from? I would like to read more about this.

Once you pour it into the soil, doesn’t it change?

When you add nutrients to it, doesn’t it change?

They are definitely different processes, deionized water is RO or a filtered water and distilled water is condensed steam gathered from boiling water.

deionized water removes ions sodium, calcium, iron, copper and anions such as chloride and bromide but will not remove non ionic organic substances,

Distilled water will remove ions and non ionic organic contaminations so the water is bacteria free until the bottle is opened.

When it comes to it being useless I’m unsure, it definitely wouldn’t give any nutritional value to the plant, after adding nutes or adding to a nuted soil it would then be active again and able to feed the plant, but used alone it is just watering.

Is Distilled Water Bad to Use for Watering Your Plants?

I am using distilled water right out of the gallon to water my plants. I have been reading mixed viewpoints on this with some saying that its bad and some saying that it doesn’t really matter. Does anyone have an explanation for this? Or recommendation for other types of water to use? Any help is much appreciated

Cobnobuler
Well-Known Member
Gaberlunzie
Well-Known Member

No, nothing wrong with distilled water as long as you ad back some micro-nutrients. Even that’s not necessary if you use a complete nutrient line like house and garden or if you use a good soil mix containing goodies like kelp meal.

And also I suppose you could die if you relied on distilled water for all your nutrient intake but most of us eat food so.

Ganja Boy 420
Well-Known Member

No, nothing wrong with distilled water as long as you ad back some micro-nutrients. Even that’s not necessary if you use a complete nutrient line like house and garden or if you use a good soil mix containing goodies like kelp meal.

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And also I suppose you could die if you relied on distilled water for all your nutrient intake but most of us eat food so.

Gaberlunzie
Well-Known Member
sunny747
Well-Known Member

Distilled water is all good.. You could, if you wanted, add a bit 1/4 tap water to the water. THis will give you a bit of cal/mag and stabilize the PH of the water once you start adding nutes.. You see Your nutes will drop the PH of your water significantly. By adding some PPM back to the mix it become more stable and you don’t have to mess with PH as much..

Your tap water is probably 300-500 PPM. Distilled water is 0 PPM. Make a 100 PPM solution by adding some tap water.

Your seedling will not need nutes for 2-3 weeks. After that either flower it or begin adding veg in the case that you will be vegging for more than a few weeks. I veg for a really long time so I need veg nutes.

az2000
Well-Known Member

The way I understand it, it’s just a matter of how impurities are removed from the water. Distillation converts water to steam, then condenses that to water (leaving the impurities behind). RO filters the water through a membrane. They both end up with 0-20 ppm. Distilled might be more reliable, producing 0-10 more consistently. RO filters can degrade, letting more impurities through. (Also totally fail, allowing >100 through).

If your tap water’s ppms are < 250 there’s no reason to use purified water. If it’s higher, you can mix tap with purified to get something in the range of 120-200p. Some people don’t like the chlorine in tap water. But, municipal water supplies are a closed, relatively clean system. Not like a swimming pool. There’s very little disinfectant added. It’s quickly exhausted by any bacterial load. Add a pinch of sugar or just spit in your water. A few hours later it should be exhausted.

The Importance Of Water Purity in Cannabis Grow

Water is not just water, depending on the source it can contain different minerals, metals, and other impurities that can end up affecting how your plant grows.

1. Why is water important?

As you may know, water is the most abundant compound and one of the most important substances on Earth, all living things need water to survive, without water there would be no life on Earth.

Just like it’s vital to use, humans, it is also vital to all plants, including cannabis plants.

Water makes up for around 85-95% of a plant’s weight, not only are they made of water but they also use water more than anything else in their vital functions.

Nutrient distribution

There are different types of nutrients you can use, synthetic or organic, synthetic nutrients will feed the roots directly and organic nutrients that make the minerals available in the soil.

In both cases, when you water your plants with a nutrient solution, the roots absorb it and transport it into the plant’s cell which is then used in combination with the other processes described above to produce sugars that are then used to grow and develop the stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds.

Now, these processes will be performed just fine with any kind of water but depending on the water source it may contain a lot of dissolved solids that can affect how well these processes work.

Transpiration

Transpiration is the process of water evaporation from leaves and stems, this happens because water is necessary to plants but only a small amount is used for growth and essential processes, around 97% is used in transpiration.

By evaporating the water, vapor is released in the atmosphere through the stomata, cooling the space around your plants, this helps keep an appropriate internal temperature and it’s essential because if the temperature is too high or too low, your plant will not be able to grow properly.

Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis is the process in which plants transform light energy into energy that can be used by them.

Light energy is absorbed and used to convert carbons and the nutrients that are in the water into organic compounds like sugars that are used in plant development and growth.

2. What are the total dissolved solids (TDS)?

Dissolved solids refer to elements in water such as minerals, salts, metals, and anything dissolved in water other than water itself.

Depending on the elements dissolved in water it will have a positive charge (cations) or a negative charge (anions) which can be measured by a TDS meter by measuring the electrical conductivity (EC) of water.

Have in mind that the EC and TDS are not the same thing but both can be calculated by knowing the exact value of one of them, to transform EC to TDS you have to multiply the value by 1000 and divide by 2, to transform the other way just multiply by 2 and divide by 1000.

Also, remember that there’s no direct relation between pH and TDS but if the elements present in the water are acidic or alkaline, it can increase or decrease the pH level.

Where do the solids come from?

Dissolved solids can come from anything your water touches when traveling to your faucet, it may come from organic matter such as leaves, silt and from runoff water from farms or lawns that contain fertilizers and pesticides.

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They can also come from inorganic matter such as rocks or even air that contains calcium, nitrogen, iron, and phosphorus among others, water can also pick up dissolved solids from the pipes it travels through, usually, water picks up lead and copper which is the metals those pipes are made out of.

Now, some of these metals and minerals are used by cannabis plants but depending on the type of nutrients and quantity you’re using, your plants can have problems, that’s why it’s essential to measure the TDS from the source.

3. Why measure the TDS level of water?

The US Environmental Protection Agency advises that a maximum of 500mg/L of total dissolved solids, higher than that it can be harmful for human consumption, and this also applies to plants.

Depending on the elements present, watering your plants with water that has more than 1000mg/L can cause plants to have problems absorbing nutrients, and can cause stunted growth, and ultimately reduced yields.

Classification of Water
Fresh Water TDS = less than 1,000 mg/L Mineral-rich, safe for consumption.
Brackish Water TDS = 1,000 to 10,000 mg/L Salt-rich can be consumed but not everyday.
Saline Water TDS = 10,000 to 35,000 mg/L High amounts of salt, can cause an overload of sodium.
Hypersaline Water TDS = more than 35,000 mg/L Extremely high amounts of salt, should not be consumed.

Elements like potassium, chloride, and sodium have minimal effects on humans and are not considered harmful. But elements like lead, nitrate, and cadmium are toxic so it’s essential you know what comes in your water, although it’s not common to find toxic elements in tap water.

4. What is hard water?

Hard water is water that contains a high amount of elements, such as calcium and magnesium, now these don’t present a threat to plants but can depend on the medium and nutrients you’re using.

When watering with hard water, the elements can end up coating the roots and soil and actually repel water instead of absorbing it.

This way your plants can end up suffering from a nutrient build-up that can bring several problems such as overfeeding or nutrient lockout and even though you can fix it by flushing, it can be relatively hard.

5. What is soft water?

Soft water is water that also contains high amounts of impurities but instead of containing hard metals, it contains soft metals such as salt and sodium.

Unlike hard water that coats the roots and causes water to be repelled, soft water makes your plants intake more water but your plants are being fooled by thinking they’re being fed, so instead of getting hydrated, they’re actually dying of dehydration.

6. How to remove or reduce TDS?

There are several ways to completely remove or at least reduce the amount of TDS in your water by filtering it, and it’s done with special equipment, although this doesn’t mean they’re super expensive.

By purifying or filtering your water, you can effectively eliminate bacteria, parasites and viruses, organic and inorganic chemicals, heavy metals, gasses, and other contaminants.

Reverse osmosis

Reverse osmosis is a way to remove contaminants from water, it works by forcing it with pressure through a membrane that removes the contaminants and provides clean water.

This system can have 3, 4, or 5 stages in which certain impurities are removed.

Each system contains the following type of filters:

  • Sediment filter: Removes dust, dirt, and rust.
  • Carbon filter: Removes or reduces organic compounds like chlorine and other elements that can give water a bad taste or odor.
  • Semi-permeable membrane: Removes up to 98% of the remaining dissolved solid like minerals and metals.

Distilled water

Distilled water is a type of purification which is made by boiling water, after it boils, the vapor is then caught with a glass container and it quickly gets condensed and turned back into a liquid form.

The impurities that were in the water do not boil at the same temperature so they are left behind in the original container, this doesn’t remove all of the dissolved solids but it’s a really effective way and has been used for a long, long time.

Deionization

Deionization (aka demineralized water) is water that has had the impurities removed, this process works by using ion-exchange resins that bind to the impurities and filters them.

This type of purification produces high-purity water and is relatively quick but does not remove bacteria or viruses effectively.

7. Can I use Rain Water For Cannabis Plants?

Rain water is “soft” and contains almost no minerals or salts so it’s a great water source and it’s 100% free. If you think about it, plants have been drinking rain water for thousands of years so if you want to collect rain water to water your plants there shouldn’t be a problem at all, right? Well, it depends.

Is rain water bad for cannabis?

Pure rain water is actually really good but it may not be safe for your plants if you collect it in places where the air quality index is high. This happens because raindrops can pick up sulfur dioxide, CO2, and mercury as they fall, which makes it unsafe. A good way to know if the rain water is safe is to check your city’s AQI (air quality index) on the web. Most big city’s AQI is fairly high so it’s possible that you’ll have to go to the countryside to be able to collect good rain water. As a guideline, an AQI ranging from 0 – 50 is considered to pose very little or no risk at all so if you check the AQI index average and it’s below 50, then you can go ahead and start collecting rain water but there are a couple of things to have in mind before using it.

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First of all, rain water’s pH can vary, especially if you collect it from different locations so make sure to always check and adjust the pH. If you don’t do it, the pH can drop drastically over time and cause a nutrient lock.

In second place, you should collect the rain as it falls. Avoid collecting rain water from the ground, gutter, or rooftop because impurities will bind to raindrops and can end up with all kinds of things such as animal hairs, mold, or chemicals. If you are forced to collect the rain water from the gutter, for example, it’s essential the gutters are clean, this means you’ll have to clean it every time you want to collect rain.

And, if you want to be extra safe, make sure to leave the water around 48hs under sunlight in order to make sure it’s even cleaner. Finally, remember that rain water contains fewer trace elements than RO water, so it’s very likely that your plants show calmag deficiency but this can be easily dealt with by adding calmag when mixing the nutrient solution and before testing the pH.

Rain Water Common Tips

For those of you that are still in doubt about using rainwater in your garden, here are the most common questions about using rainwater on cannabis plants.

Can I mix my nutrient solution with rain water?

Definitely. As long as you’ve collected the water correctly, measured, and adjusted the pH, you can use it just as you would use any kind of water.

What’s the best way to collect rain water?

The best way to collect water is basically the simplest. Just place a rainwater collector, a big bucket, or any type of plastic container outside and let it fill. Once it’s full just place a lid (or a fine mesh) and that’s it!

For how long can I store rain water?

If stored properly, rainwater can be stored for a long time. So if you want to store water for more than just a couple of days, it’s highly recommended to filter it with a 50-micron mesh to remove any possible mosquito eggs and any other impurities. Once your rainwater is filtered, store it in a hard plastic container and place a lid or fine mesh to avoid contamination.

Have in mind that you should check and adjust the pH of the rain water just before watering your plants and not before storing it because in most cases the pH will go up or down when stored.

How do I check and adjust the rain water’s pH?

Checing and adjusting the rain water’s pH is the same as any other type of water. So just get a pH pen and check the pH first, once you know the pH, it’s just a matter of using pH Down or pH Up solutions to adjust it to the desired pH. Remember that the atmosphere plays a huge role on rainwater’s pH.

For example, if it hasn’t rained for a while, there may be a lot of dust in the air, and dust (in some areas) has a high calcium content which can cause the rain’s pH to be 8.0 or higher but, after a couple of hours raining, the pH may be much much lower, reaching around 5.8 in just a couple of hours. This happens because the rain can basically clean off all the dust particles in the air, so after a couple of hours there wouldn’t be a high concentration of dust and the rainwater would be relatively clean. This is why you should check the pH always, no matter what.

Can I flush my cannabis plants with rain water?

Of course. As long as you’ve checked and adjusted the pH to the desired level, you can use rainwater for flushing without any problems at all.

8. Extra tips for purifying water

  • You can leave your water in a bucket at room temperature from 24hs up to a couple of days or have air stones in it to remove chlorine.
  • You can remove calcium and magnesium by boiling water but without the proper equipment, it’s impossible to know how effective it is.
  • Have in mind that the quality of water can change over time so it’s essential you measure it or request an analysis every couple of months.
  • Even though our plants use some of the elements found in water, it’s essential you know the amount in it. The more impurities it contains, the less “good” nutrients your plant will absorb.

9. In conclusion

Even though it might seem that it’s just water, water is the most essential compound for all living things on Earth, and despite growers not realizing this when they first start cultivating, water is super important in all the processes your cannabis plants need to perform in order to grow healthy and strong so it’s super important to know exactly what you’re watering your plants with.

Obviously, you can water with whatever you want but by providing better quality water, you will see a big difference in the end results.

If you filter or purify the water you use on your plants, please share with our fellow growers in the comment section below if you’ve seen big differences and if you found it worth it.