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Construction is booming and 25-to-35-year-olds are flooding into the county from the District, Fairfax County and Maryland. But even starter apartments in Arlington are moving out of range for a large portion of the workforce because incomes have not kept up with the rising cost of housing, according to a study compiled by a county task force. Patricia Sullivan Petition by Green Party to be on the November ballot. The increase in Arlington rents has outpaced incomes, contributing to a crisis in affordable housing, according to the study. The preliminary findings from the first year of a three-year review of the countys affordable-housing situation shows that during the past 10 years, the average rent jumped 47percent while the average salary increased 37percent. This year, rents are up 6.4percent and the vacancy rate is at 1.1percent. Average monthly rents in 2012 ranged from $1,422 for an efficiency to $2,782 for a three-bedroom apartment, the county calculated. What it means is that a family of four with an income of $86,000 is largely limited to 1- or 2-bedroom condominiums and townhouses, the study said. Those who earn less are left to scramble for a unit in the shrinking pool of lower-cost apartments. For lower income employment sectors (such as retail, hospitality and food services), average salaries have not kept pace with the increase in average rents, contributing to an affordability gap between rent and income, the study found. Local officials call the growing disparity a critical issue for communities such as visit their website Arlington, one of the wealthiest parts of the Washington region and the nation. Last year, the median price of a single-family home http://www.campusedgefresno.com/ in the county was $690,000. The condo median was $372,000. That might not be a problem for the half of Arlington households whose incomes exceed $100,000. But the other half is split almost evenly between those who make $60,000 to $99,999 and those who earn less than $60,000. The regional problem of affordable housing was on display earlier this month when about 3,000 people applied for 122 apartments at the new Arlington Mill affordable-housing complex on Columbia Pike. More than half of the applicants were from outside Arlington. The Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing, one of the nonprofit organizations that receives county funds for creating and managing housing, said 89.5percent of the applicants were from Virginia, and of that group, about 91percent were from Arlington, Alexandria or Falls Church. The average household income that the applicants reported was $28,679, far below the areas median income of $75,300 for a single person or $107,500 for a family of four. Partnership officials were also surprised that 36percent of the applicants were single; Arlington has traditionally focused on housing families, and one of the benefits of the Arlington Mill complex is that most of its units have two or three bedrooms. Those numbers illustrate some of the reasons why the County Board called for a housing study and why a coalition of churches has organized to put a spotlight on the lowest-earning families. Arlington is spending about $57million in fiscal 2014 for affordable-housing assistance in a variety of forms, and it negotiates with developers to set aside some of the new construction for affordable units. Its grants, including federal funds that used to be known as Section 8 vouchers, to low-income households have provided an average monthly subsidy of $548 to almost 5,000 families, including people with disabilities and the elderly. While people of many races are represented on all rungs of the income ladder, whites predominate among those who make more than $100,000, while Asians, blacks and Hispanics in Arlington on the whole make less, the study reports, based on U.S. census data. Affordability will impact the demographic makeup, said Russell Danao-Schroeder, a county staffer working on the study. The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments expects that Arlington will need at least 21,000 additional housing units by 2040. Those who say government should not be in the housing business overlook an important issue, County Board member Mary Hynes said. The market really doesnt ensure the long-term vibrancy of the community, she said. Theres a continuum here, and we need not to have gaps in that continuum. The term affordable housing means different things to different people, Hynes said.

Revived Greenwich Park Apartments is latest E. North Ave. project

North Ave. project By Tom Daykin of the Journal Sentinel Sept. 27, 2013 View All Blog Posts Mercy Housing Lakefront Inc. is reviving its proposal for Greenwich Park Apartments on Milwaukee’s east side. The Common Council in 2011 approved zoning for a 54-unit, five-story building. It was planned for what is now a parking lot about a half block north of E. North Ave., between N. Farwell and N. Murray avenues. But Chicago-based Mercy was unable that year to obtain federal affordable housing tax credits to help finance the development. Those credits require developers to lease apartments at below-market rents to people earning no more than 60% of the area median income. Mercy is again seeking the tax credits, said Lisa Kuklinski, vice president for public affairs and new markets. The Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority, which grants hyperlink the credits in Wisconsin, plans to award credits for a lone project this fall, and will award credits for several projects next spring, she said. The authority and other agencies nationwide are showing more willingness to provide credits for developments built in moderate-income areas, Kuklinski said. The idea is that those developments are often closer to jobs for people living in those apartments. Greenwich Park would be within a few blocks of Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital, whose employees would likely be among many of the development’s residents, Kuklinski said. A new ordinance, to be reviewed by the Common Council’s Zoning, Neighborhoods and Development Committee, would make changes to Greenwich Park’s site plan, building elevations, unit count and parking space count. Under that proposal, Greenwich Park would be developed in two phases. The proposal didn’t elaborate on those proposed changes, which Kuklinski said would include adding a few more units. She said meetings will be scheduled to reintroduce the revised plan to neighborhood residents before the committee review, which hasn’t yet been scheduled. The project would be among a series of new apartment communities that are under development along or near E. North Ave., between N. Prospect Ave. and N. Humboldt Blvd. Those include the 122-unit 1150 North apartments, planned for the north side of E. North Ave., just west of N. Commerce St.; a 39-unit building being developed at the former Pizza Man site, at the northeast corner of E.

Look for serious spinning later, but for now well offer an example that illustrates the mood. The MetNews has a good story with highlights from the report, and this statement from Fourth District Court of Appeal Justice Douglas Miller, chair of the significant Executive and Planning Committee: The Court Statistics Report is a useful reference document that provides an annual snapshot of statewide filings data and indicates multi-year trends the raw data raises questions that require more in-depth analysis before drawing any conclusions. So there. Justice Miller, after noting that more analysis is required, also noted that minds are made up on a couple of things. Although were uncertain about the conclusions, council members and our justice system partners are certain about how budget cuts have affected the public and have impacted access to justiceincluding reduced hours and closed courtrooms, fewer law enforcement officers on the street, and the reallocation of resources to focus on certain case types or services. EMAIL TO A FRIEND X To Please use one to three valid email addresses. From Please use a valid email address. Your Message You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it. Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas. ? More Tagging tips: A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for “Barack Obama,” is this a diary they’d be trying to find? Use a person’s full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office. If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor’s http://www.campusedgefresno.com/ race. Tags do not compound: that is, “education reform” is a completely different tag from “education”. A tag like “reform” alone is probably not meaningful. Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights , Community , Congress , Culture , Economy , Education , Elections , Energy , Environment , Health Care , International , Labor , Law , http://www.campusedgefresno.com/ Media , Meta , National Security , Science , Transportation , or White House . If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state ( California , Texas , etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don’t fit in any of these tags. Don’t worry if yours doesn’t. You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it: Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist? Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards. Rescue this diary, and add a note: Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue? Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it news appear. You must be a member of a group to use this feature. Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself: Are you sure you want to remove this diary? Unpublish Diary

founder Jyoti Bansal left CA Inc. (CA) five years ago to develop competitive software for businesses to monitor their applications. Now his startup is approaching $100 million in annual revenue and is setting the stage for an initial public offering. Bansal, 35, built AppDynamics for the age of cloud and mobile computing, catering to companies that are developing data-intensive apps. Customers like travel site Expedia Inc. (EXPE) and cable provider Cablevision Systems Corp. are paying AppDynamics more than $1 million a year for software to rapidly spot glitches on servers and databases, according to Bansal. AppDynamics, founded in 2008, is vying for a bigger slice of the information technology operations and management software market, which Gartner Inc. says increased 4.8 percent to $18 billion last year. Traditional suppliers to the monitoring market like CA, Compuware Corp. and BMC Software Inc. arent built for the cloud, Bansal said in an interview. The market is primarily dominated by the dinosaur vendors, said Bansal, whose company has raised $86.5 million from investors including Greylock Partners and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Most of these companies are really other struggling, and the market share is rapidly getting taken over by companies like us. Revenue at AppDynamics surged 165 percent in the first half of this year from the same period in 2012, and the company will be generating $100 million in annual sales by mid-2014, Bansal said. Finding Glitches AppDynamicss software allows businesses to track the performance of their apps and websites and quickly respond when a site crashes or if customers in a particular region are experiencing slow connection speeds. While 270 of the companys 300 employees are in the San http://www.campus-edge.com Francisco headquarters, AppDynamics is bolstering its international business to reach more customers in Europe and Asia. The company said today that it acquired Nodetime , a startup in Germany whose software helps businesses track mobile apps. AppDynamics isnt the only emerging company chasing the incumbents. Bansals former boss, Lew Cirne, is CEO of New Relic Inc., which started the same year as AppDynamics. Cirne previously founded Wily Technology Inc., where Bansal worked until the company was bought by CA in 2006. New Relic, another provider of application-monitoring software, got its start going after small and mid-sized businesses and is now increasingly winning big deals, said Chris Cook, operating chief of the San Francisco-based company. Sales surged 130 percent in the first half of 2013, and customers include Best Buy Co. and Walt Disney Co., he said. Enterprise has been the fastest growing part of our business, Cook said. Market Shift According to Gartner, International Business Machines Corp., CA, BMC and Hewlett-Packard Co. (HPQ) accounted for almost half of the IT operations software market last year. Yet all four surrendered market share in 2012, while a new generation of ITOM vendors grew significantly faster than the market, the researcher wrote, in a May 21 report. In addition to competing with CA, Bansal is being forced to contend with a lawsuit from his previous employer. CA, based in Islandia, New York, filed a patent infringement suit against AppDynamics in April, claiming that Bansal was developing products related to three IT patents. In November, CA sued New Relic, asserting that it had infringed patents obtained through the acquisition of Wily. Bansal said that while the suit will cost the company a few million dollars in legal fees, he is confident that AppDynamics will win and hasnt infringed anything. Fear Factor CAs intention is primarily to use lawsuits as a fear factor in the market, Bansal said. Its unfortunate that CA has come to that instead of innovating and competing head to head. Jennifer Hallahan, a spokeswoman for CA, said the case is going forward and that AppDynamicss software clearly infringes the Wily patents. The company will take all steps necessary to ensure that our intellectual property is protected, Hallahan said in a statement. AppDynamics hasnt decided when it will go public, though Bansal said the company is in the process of hiring a chief financial officer and will be big enough for an IPO next year. He puts AppDynamics in the same category as business technology companies Splunk Inc. (SPLK) , ServiceNow Inc. and Palo Alto Networks Inc., which all went public last year after taking market share from more established vendors. Every business is moving to the cloud, Bansal said. To contact the reporter on this story: Ari Levy in San Francisco at [email protected] To contact the editor responsible for this story: Pui-Wing Tam at [email protected] More News:

Apartments a scale for South Koreans’ progress

(Baltimore Sun photo by Kim Hairston /September 20, 2013) By Jacques Kelly September 20, 2013, 3:58 p.m. The return of the former Gunther Brewery gave me a jolt of Baltimore confidence. One of our long-lost landmarks, really a fine industrial campus, has rebounded after a lengthy hiatus. More than a year of intensive reconstruction and refurbishment has made this Brewers Hill gem shine. In a few weeks, the first group of its 162 new apartments will be ready. A tall smokestack rising above Boston Street marks the new Gunther Apartments and what promises to be a large restaurant (this space is unrented as of yet) in the former boiler house. Even the old granite blocks that once paved the space where the delivery wagons assembled have been repurposed in a tenants’ landscaped courtyard. About a year ago, I toured the brewery’s shell and walked away confused. Could order ever be imposed on this disheveled industrial campus at 1211 S. Conkling St.? Would the home of the beer that played second fiddle to mighty National Bohemian ever gain some respect? And more to the point, will tenants go for the $1,600 to $2,000 rents? Would the newly built Domain and Hanover Brewers Hill apartments, constructed on either side of the old brew house, outshine this one-time labyrinth of malt and hops fermenting tanks? Jacques Kelly Retired teacher strives to improve Auchentoroly Terrace After spending a few minutes at what has evolved as Canton-Brewers Hill, I found myself endorsing the energy of the neighborhood. I’m not sure I’m in the same Baltimore of old parish churches and white marble steps, but the change is welcome. Workers were completing a new Boston Street shopping center and Target store. The dog walkers outnumbered the stroller pushers, but I got the idea this was an under-35, out-and-walking neighborhood. I blinked my eyes and thought, hey, wasn’t all this a backwater of petroleum tank farms and freight cars not so long ago? Who imagined the trend that gained traction with the Tindeco Wharf apartments would push this far eastward? But this is the new Southeast Baltimore. Breakfasters were having their coffee and muffins at a Panera Bread in the former Gunther bottling house. They parked their vehicles in the old rail yard. “Historic redevelopment is a very slow process,” said David Knipp, a member of the Obrecht Commercial Real Estate development team that has invested in and nursed this dramatic comeback. When I asked him about the price tag on the Gunther investment, he replied, “Substantial.” Workers spent months removing the steel storage tanks. They were housed in a building that is now a parking garage. Once removed, the huge vats’ spaces became the right size to park a car. Residents moving into the Gunther complex will live in buildings called Ale, Pilsener and Barley. Each is marked by a sign shaped like a beer bottle cap suspended over the sidewalk by an oversized structural bottle opener. I was delighted by a banner proclaiming the Gunther trademark logo of my childhood. People forget that brewery owner, attorney and philanthropist Zanvyl Krieger was an important early investor in the 1954 Orioles and that his brews were all over the old Memorial Stadium scoreboard in those early years of the franchise. As a brand, Gunther disappeared more than 50 years ago. The brewery ceased operating in the 1970s and found no other use than storing horseradish for the Tulkoff family. It might have become apartments earlier, but the 2008 recession put the brakes on development. It also required a developer with imagination. The Gunther complex grew as Baltimore’s population and taste for beer grew.

After decades of economic growth, South Korea is the land of apartments

After decades of economic growth, South Korea is the land of apartments (Shin Woong-jae/ For The Washington Post ) – Banpo Xi apartment complex and other apartments are seen in Seoul, South Korea. Banpo Xi is one of the most expensive apartment complexes in South Korea. By Chico Harlan , E-mail the writer SEOUL South Korea is a nation covered by apartments, so much so that from above, it resembles a coast-to-coast line of dominoes. Apartment buildings snake around mountains and form jarring clusters in the countryside. In cities, they align in grids that stretch for miles. Apartment buildings first sprouted decades ago as a way to accommodate South Koreas booming middle class, and they were the picture of a nation in rapid ascent. Attackers storm Nairobi mall, killing dozens and taking hostages Sudarsan Raghavan Al-Shabab, a Somali militia linked to al-Qaeda, asserts responsibility for the assault; witnesses say the dead and injured include young and old, Kenyans and foreigners. Chinese court convicts Bo Xilai of corruption Simon Denyer Ousted Communist Party official Bo Xilai was found guilty of corruption, embezzlement and abuse of power Sunday and sentenced to life in prison. North Korea postpones family reunion event with South Chico Harlan The South says restoring the reunions is an urgent matter for the aging survivors of the Korean War. Will Englund A momentous choice between East and West faces Ukraine in its pending trade agreement with the E.U. But the most remarkable thing about them isnt the national transformation they heralded, urban design experts say: Its their staying power. South Korea today is dominated by tech giants, its streets filled with neon lights, coffee shops and barbecue joints. But despite its first-world status, it hasnt seen a new demand for townhouses, city-center living or artsy warehouse districts. Rather, people still prefer to live in apartments that look nearly unchanged from the boom years units built by Hyundai or Samsung or Lotte, in buildings 15 to 30 stories tall. Although the countrys real-estate market has slowed, apartments form the backbone of preplanned cities under construction, such as Dongtan, where 100 complexes for 310,000 people are being built in a loose ring around a golf course. Apartment buildings are also pushing into some of Seouls classic neighborhoods. A few mid-size cities have mega-towers, 60-some stories high. Some South Koreans say that the apartments have become a symbol of success and that moves into bigger units serve as milestones in their lives. After college: first apartment. After marriage: a bigger apartment. As children grow: a similar apartment in a better school district. The average Korean moves every five years, a steady vertical migration, and about 60percent live in apartments, up from 1percent 40 years ago, according to a recent book, Apartment, written by Park Cheol-soo, a professor at the University of Seoul. Theyre just stacked up Most Korean apartments are rectangular, and few have balconies. Their biggest windows tend to face south or southeast, offering the most sunlight. Most buildings have construction company logos and unit numbers stamped on the sides. They do not rise from the street with businesses in the bottom floor or two. Rather, theyre built in complexes that are strictly residential, with one or two guarded entrances. Only residents or approved visitors may enter. Modern facilities have playgrounds or fitness centers for residents. Koreans arent blind to the downside of such a style. The walled complexes close off large plots of land to the public, and the apartments themselves cut the nation into millions of impersonal cells. At one complex in Jamsil , on the outskirts of Seoul, 19,000 people live in a single city block containing 72 high-rises. There isnt much design inspiration. Theyre just stacked up, said Park In-seok, an architecture professor at Myongji University. He described a paradox in which the apartments are mocked for their appearance but coveted for their convenience. Almost everybody hates the apartment, Park said. But everybody wants to live in one. Continued

fresno homes for sale style=‘float:left;padding:5px’ /> Most Korean apartments are rectangular, and few have balconies. Their biggest windows tend to face the south or southeast, allowing in the most sunlight. Most buildings have construction-company logos and unit numbers stamped onto the sides. They do not rise from the street with businesses in the bottom floor or two. Rather, theyre built in complexes that are strictly residential, with one or two guarded entrances. Only residents or approved visitors may enter. Modern facilities have playgrounds or fitness centers for residents. Koreans arent blind to the downside of such a style. The walled complexes close off large plots of land to the public, and the apartments themselves cut the nation into millions of impersonal cells. At one complex in Jamsil, on the outskirts of Seoul, 19,000 people live in a single city block containing 72 high-rises. There isnt much design inspiration. Theyre just stacked up, said Park In-Seok, an architecture professor at Myongji University. He described a paradox in which the apartments are mocked for their appearance but coveted for their convenience. Almost everybody hates the apartment, Park said. But everybody wants to live in one. South Korean society emphasizes the family, not the community, and analysts say the apartments reflect that: The individual units look much nicer than the buildings theyre in. Particularly in apartments built since the 1990s, the interiors are comfortable, with wooden floors and stainless-steel kitchens. Outside maintenance is taken care of, and families can focus on their own spaces. It is convenient, said Kim Sung-Jin, an employee at Dell who has lived in three apartment buildings in the past 17 years. Plus you have a security guard. Theres a parking space for you. Theres a school nearby. The apartments, initially, were a means home for rent to hold the nation together during postwar growth. Government officials sometimes said that if people became dissatisfied with their living situations, theyd be more likely to protest against the government, at the time controlled by military leaders. The first apartment buildings, Koreas national housing developer said in the 1960s, would contribute to the aesthetics of the capital city and serve as a propaganda tool showing Pyongyang the affluence of the South. Many of South Koreas early apartment designers studied in the United States and were perhaps influenced by the boxy look of stand-alone suburban homes, some experts say. But they acknowledge that South Koreas apartments have a distinctly Communist feel and resemble the units in some parts of Moscow. South Korean construction companies try to differentiate their apartment buildings each firm uses its brand name, like the IPark, the Castle but experts admit theres little difference. An annual contest names the best apartment complex constructed within the previous year. Ten urban designers and architects tour the country by bus, inspecting buildings and interviewing residents. One judge says that copycat designs are rampant and that modest innovations by one developer are soon adopted by another. Fitness centers. Artificial streams. Underground parking. Ahn Kun-hyuck, the lead panelist, said the contest in some years is very hard to judge. If the apartments have a beauty, its best viewed from afar a scale that recognizes their utility and militant geometry. Kim, the Dell employee, is an amateur photographer, and he sometimes darts out of work at dusk and heads to mountain ridges or scenic lookout points.

AppDynamics Nears IPO, Taking on CA With App-Tracking Software

The Negative Watch reflects Fitch’s concern that F/ETCA may not be able to successfully execute its planned restructuring of outstanding debt in the next three to six months and, therefore, may be unable to improve its financial flexibility. The proposed restructuring is dependent on the extension of the California Department of Transportation’s (Caltrans; operator of the toll road) cooperative agreement and is also highly sensitive to interest rates. Although market rates appear to be currently moving in a favorable direction, it is not clear that rates will fall to a level that makes the restructuring economically viable. The restructuring requires F/ETCA and Caltrans to agree to a revised cooperative agreement. Fitch understands that it has not yet been possible for the two agencies to reach an agreement. In Fitch’s view, the proposed 13-year extension of the agreement is critical to successful execution of the transaction. In the absence of a meaningful restructuring, it is Fitch’s view that the financial profile of the existing debt is not consistent with investment grade. In such a scenario, Fitch would likely downgrade the current ‘BBB-’ rating to ‘BB+’. Conversely, if the agency is able to execute this, or a similar, transaction that has the effect of improving financial flexibility, Fitch believes an investment grade rating, broadly in line with the expected ratings previously assigned, should be attainable. KEY RATING DRIVERS –Limited Traffic Profile: The Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor (F/ETC or the facility) serves as a highway connection for commuters in Orange and Riverside Counties. Traffic has grown only marginally over the homepage last decade due to seven, mostly above inflationary, toll increases since fiscal 2000 (ended June 30). Future growth potential is limited in part by the narrow corridor in which development can take place. Revenue Risk Volume: Midrange. –Price Sensitive Commuter Traffic: F/ETCA has limited economic rate-making flexibility as current toll rates are close to the revenue maximization point. The average toll rate is higher than peers at more than 30 cents per mile. It is Fitch’s view that greater than inflationary increases may be required over time. A history of pro-active decisions by management to raise rates has historically been a credit strength, although it impacts the agency’s rate-making flexibility going forward. Revenue Risk Price: Weaker. –Fully Amortizing, Back Loaded Debt: Without a restructuring, the debt service profile steadily increases to maximum annual debt service (MADS) of $298 million at final maturity in fresno rentals fiscal 2040. The agency’s MADS equivalent debt service reserve is projected to remain healthy at $298 million in fiscal 2013, providing some mitigation against the sharply escalating debt service profile. Debt Structure Risk: Weaker. –Weak Financial Flexibility: Leverage is high at approximately 18x. F/ETCA is dependent on continued toll rate increases and traffic and revenue growth throughout the life of the debt to maintain coverage levels at or above 1.30x. In fiscal 2013, the debt service coverage ratio (DSCR) was 1.37x utilizing $13.5 million of the EDF and 1.17x without the assistance. The Fitch base case DSCR indicates a minimum of 0.93x in fiscal 2022 and an average of 0.99x through 2040 without the use of the EDF. The agency’s overall liquidity totaling nearly $450 million provides considerable cushion for periods of underperformance. Debt Service Risk: Weaker. –Manageable Approved Capital Program: The F/ETC corridor is less than 15 years old and does not currently have any material state of good repair needs. The agency’s fiscal 2013-2014 capital improvement program (CIP) is small at $47 million. A large portion of the CIP has not received the necessary environmental permits or record of decisions to proceed. The State of California’s obligation to maintain the physical assets and a covenant to budget for capital expenditures annually provides some protection. Infrastructure Development/Renewal Risk: Stronger. SECURITY The bonds are secured by a pledge of net revenues and certain other pledged revenues such as development impact fees (DIF). F/ETCA has the right to withdraw up to $5 million DIFs to be used for any lawful purpose. CREDIT UPDATE F/ETCA’s DSCR declined to 1.17x in fiscal 2013 from 1.35x in fiscal 2009 despite several toll increases. Fitch expects coverage levels to erode significantly further as debt service rises nearly 70% over the next decade. In Fitch’s view, F/ETC has limited traffic growth potential and pricing power is weak. Traffic on F/ETC has fluctuated with the economy and has reacted to a series of toll rate increases. Fiscal 2013 traffic of just 55.4 million is 18% below the peak reached in fiscal 2007 of 67.6 million and equals levels last seen in fiscal 2002. The effect of the recent traffic declines has been more than offset by toll increases, resulting in growing toll revenues. The TCA has increased toll rates six times since fiscal 2007 including the recent increase in fiscal 2014 (July 2013). In 2012, toll revenues grew by 7%, and 2013 saw continued growth of just over 4% to a new peak of $111.7 million. Fitch Ratings has withdrawn the ‘BBB-’ and ‘BB’ ratings on the following F/ETCA issues as these bonds were not sold: –Junior lien toll road rfdg rev bonds (current interest bonds) ser 2013B; –Second senior toll road rfdg rev bonds (callable stepped coupon bonds) (taxable) ser 2013C; –Second senior toll road rfdg rev bonds (capital appreciation bonds) ser 2013A; –Second senior toll road rfdg rev bonds (convertible capital appreciation bonds) ser 2013A; –Second senior toll road rfdg rev bonds (current interest bonds) ser 2013A; –Second senior toll road rfdg rev bonds (current interest bonds) ser 2013D. Additional information is available at www.fitchratings.com . Applicable Criteria and Related Research: –’Rating Criteria for Infrastructure and Project Finance’ (July 12, 2012); –’Rating Criteria for Toll Roads, Bridges, and Tunnels’ (Aug. 2, 2012). Applicable Criteria and Related Research: Rating Criteria for Infrastructure and Project Finance http://www.fitchratings.com/gws/en/disclosure/solicitation?pr_id=802573 ALL FITCH CREDIT RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CERTAIN LIMITATIONS AND DISCLAIMERS. PLEASE READ THESE LIMITATIONS AND DISCLAIMERS BY FOLLOWING THIS LINK: HTTP://FITCHRATINGS.COM/UNDERSTANDINGCREDITRATINGS .

(CA) five years ago to develop competitive software for businesses to monitor their applications. Now his startup is approaching $100 million in annual revenue and is setting the stage for an initial public offering. Bansal, 35, built AppDynamics for the age of cloud and mobile computing, catering to companies that are developing data-intensive apps. Customers like travel site Expedia Inc. (EXPE) and cable provider Cablevision Systems Corp. are paying AppDynamics more than $1 million a year for software to rapidly spot glitches on servers and databases, according to Bansal. AppDynamics, founded in 2008, is vying for a bigger slice of the information technology operations and management software market, which Gartner Inc. says increased 4.8 percent to $18 billion last year. Traditional suppliers to the monitoring market like CA, Compuware Corp. and BMC Software Inc. arent built for the cloud, Bansal said in an interview. The market is primarily dominated by the dinosaur vendors, said Bansal, whose company has raised $86.5 million from investors including Greylock Partners and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Most of these companies are really struggling, and the market share is rapidly getting taken over by companies like us. Revenue at AppDynamics surged 165 percent in the first half of this year from the same period in 2012, and the company will be generating $100 million in annual sales by mid-2014, Bansal said. Finding Glitches AppDynamicss software allows businesses to track the performance of their apps and websites and quickly respond when a site crashes or if customers in a particular region are experiencing slow connection speeds. While 270 of the companys 300 employees are in the San Francisco headquarters, AppDynamics is bolstering its international business to reach more customers in Europe and Asia. The company said today that it acquired Nodetime , a startup in Germany whose software helps businesses track mobile apps. AppDynamics isnt the only emerging company chasing the incumbents. Bansals former boss, Lew Cirne, is CEO of New Relic Inc., which started the same year as AppDynamics. home for rent Cirne previously founded Wily Technology Inc., where Bansal worked until the company was bought by CA in 2006. New Relic, another provider of application-monitoring software, got its start going after small and mid-sized businesses and is now increasingly winning big deals, said Chris Cook, operating chief of the San Francisco-based company. Sales surged 130 percent in the first half of 2013, and customers include Best Buy Co. and Walt Disney Co., he said. Enterprise has been the fastest growing part of our business, Cook said. Market Shift According to Gartner, International Business Machines Corp., CA, BMC and Hewlett-Packard Co. (HPQ) accounted for almost half of the IT operations software market last year. Yet all four surrendered market share in 2012, while a new generation of ITOM vendors grew significantly faster than the market, the researcher wrote, in a May 21 report. In addition to competing with CA, Bansal is being forced to contend with a lawsuit from his previous employer. CA, based in Islandia, New York, filed a patent infringement suit against AppDynamics in April, claiming that Bansal was developing products related to three IT patents. In November, CA sued New Relic, asserting that it had infringed patents obtained through the acquisition of Wily. Bansal said that while the suit will cost the company a few million dollars in legal fees, he is confident that AppDynamics will win and hasnt infringed anything. Fear Factor CAs intention is primarily to use lawsuits as a fear factor in the market, Bansal said. Its unfortunate that CA has come to that instead of innovating and competing head to head. Jennifer Hallahan, a spokeswoman for CA, said the case is going forward and that AppDynamicss software clearly infringes the Wily patents. The company will take all steps necessary to ensure that our intellectual property is protected, Hallahan said in a statement. AppDynamics hasnt decided when it will go public, though Bansal said the company is in the process of hiring a chief financial officer and will be big enough for an IPO next year. He puts AppDynamics in the same category as business technology companies Splunk Inc. (SPLK) , ServiceNow Inc.

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Arlington also offered a 90 percent property tax refund over 30 years to support the public-private partnership with the developer of Viridian, a 2,300-acre mixed-use housing development farther north. Arlington as a city is rethinking itself and how it wants to grow and evolve and build on its strength, developer Robert Kembel said. Nearby homeowners and city officials have been trying for years to bring new life to the section of North Arlington between Cooper and Collins streets. Many of the apartments in the area are nearly 40 years old and in serious decline. Its a prime spot for renewal, with easy access to Interstate 30 and proximity to AT&T Stadium, Rangers Ballpark in Arlington and a rejuvenated downtown entertainment district. But for dozens of low-income families, its home. DRAWING A NEW CROWD City officials and Kembel have made no secret about targeting a different population with the new upscale apartments, which will only offer one- or two-bedroom options. We really want to discourage families from living in this housing type, Kembel said at an Aug. 26 town hall meeting on the project. Thats not our market. But Kembel said he will retain their rent money to assist with relocating the families. Many say they like living in the apartments and dont see the need to move. Alex Gonzalez, his wife and their young son have lived at the Water Chase apartments for more than two years. Gonzalez, who works in Grand Prairie, said he likes the location and the community in the complex. We like it here.Theres not really a lot of 911 emergency calls here, he said. I used to live in apartments where there was a lot of activity, but its pretty quiet here. In the meantime, developers are buying up four apartment lots spanning from Rolling Hills Country Club near Cooper Street to Lincoln Drive. They have not set a demolition date. The upscale apartments are meant to encourage other mixed-use development in the area and to serve as an example of the citys future. These are the kinds of things were trying to do in other parts of the city, Deputy Mayor Pro Tem Jimmy Bennett said at the town hall meeting. The upscale apartment development on Lamar will be similar in concept to Hebron 121 Station a luxury apartment complex in Lewisville that Kembel helped design when he was president of Huffines Communities. Public funds will go toward the demolition and land acquisition costs, park improvements, street parking on Lamar Boulevard and an improved golf course entryway. Kembel said he expects the Arlington development to perform better than Hebron 121 Station because of the location, and he has looked to developments in Uptown Dallas, Addison Circle and West Seventh Street in Fort Worth to guide his vision for Lamar Boulevard. STAYING RELEVANT Its a style encouraged by city officials in hopes that it will keep Arlington relevant. If we dont have it, then those population groups will choose to go elsewhere, said Bruce Payne, economic development director for the city. Once they leave the city, Im hard-pressed to come up with reasons why they might return. More than 200 Arlington residents attended last months town hall meeting, many expressing concerns about replacing the aging apartments with more apartments, especially with an already overextended elementary school nearby. City officials pointed out that the cost of redeveloping the land as single-family homes was too high. But in the process of redevelopment, dozens of families will be pushed out of apartments that are within walking distance of an elementary school that offers afternoon programs through the Boys and Girls Club. The new apartments cost will probably average $1.50 a square foot, which would be about $900 a month for a 600-square-foot apartment. That compares to $500 for a similar unit in the existing complexes. The new vision is a sharp contrast to the suburban Arlington of previous decades.

Low-income apartments citywide preserved by Portland Housing Bureau, nonprofit and private partners

pubdate:09/15/2013 21:55 EDT! commentPeriod:14! commentEndDate:9/29/13 9:55 EDT! currentDate:9/16/13 8:0 EDT! allowComments:true! displayComments:true! In Tysons Corner, rents are down for offices and apartments By Michael Donnelly, Tysons Corner is in the beginning stages of a transformation to a 21st century urban center. The Dulles Corridor Metrorail Project will bring Metrorail to Dulles International Airport and beyond. The Tysons Land Use Task Force has come up with a plan that, by the year 2050, would result in as many as 100,000 residents and 200,000 employees in Tysons Corner (compared with an estimated 17,000 residents and 126,400 employees today). These ambitious plans mean significant commercial and residential development is ahead. Office market: Rents edging down LivingSocial heads in a new direction Steven Overly The company aims to take the daily out of its deals by offering a larger selection thats available all the time. Steven Overly PointWorthy allows customers to donate loyalty points from banks, hotels to charities in form of cash. Tysons Corner, with 28.1 million square feet of office space, is one of the largest suburban submarkets in the country and one of the most popular addresses in the Washington area. Net absorption of office space in the region (the change in leased space) in the second quarter of 2013 totaled positive 56,000 square feet, but negative 28,000 for the first half of 2013. This compares to negative 132,000 square feet during all of 2012 and the 10-year annual average absorption of positive 48,000 square feet. The direct office vacancy rate rose slightly to 14.1 percent as of the second quarter of 2013, from 14.0 percent at the end of 2012. The overall vacancy rate (with sublet space included) was 15.1 percent at mid-year 2013. Average effective office rents (after concessions) in Tysons Corner decreased 2.5 percent to $21.25 per square foot during the first half of 2013. Given an elevated vacancy rate and limited demand, effective rents should continue to edge down during the balance of 2013, as landlords offer generous concession packages to attract tenants. New buildings, especially ones near the new Metrorail stations and high-quality retail, will see rent growth sooner than others. Apartment market: Becoming more competitive During the past 12 months, the high-end (Class A) apartment market in Tysons Corner/Merrifield experienced a 3.3 percent decrease in average effective rent, while the overall vacancy rate increased to 8.6 percent from 3.8 percent one year earlier. The overall vacancy rate for Tysons increased partially because of the arrival of a new project, Avalon Park Crest, which added 354 units to the market. Effective rents for Class A high-rise apartments averaged $1,995 a month, compared with $2,062 per month a year earlier. Concessions currently represent about 0.5 percent of face rent in this segment. The pipeline of new apartments in Tysons Corner is substantial. In the second quarter of 2013, there were three projects with 983 units currently under construction, but not yet being marketed. There are an additional seven projects with 2,102 units planned to deliver within the next 36 months. With more than 3,000 new units in the 36-month development pipeline it is likely that the Tysons Corner apartment market will become increasingly competitive during the balance of 2013. However, once the new Metrorail stations open we believe there will be a significant uptick in apartment demand in Tysons Corner. In 2014 and beyond, we think Tysons Corner will remain competitive as new projects come on line and rents will likely remain stable. Condominium market: Quiet There are currently no condominium-specific projects being marketed or planned to start within three years. However, there are a significant number of projects that may deliver as either apartments or condominiums. During the previous development boom in the mid-2000s Tysons added 1,240 condominium units. Michael Donnelly is a senior associate at Delta Associates. Staff at Delta Associates contributed to this article. For more information, please visit www.deltaassociates.com .

After decades of growth, South Korea is now a land full of apartments

In cities, they align in grids that stretch for miles. Apartment buildings first sprouted decades ago as a way to accommodate South Koreas booming middle class, and they were the picture of a nation in rapid ascent. Anthony Faiola and Karla Adam Many abroad react with horror, but not shock, after the mass shooting at the Navy Yard. In Syria, inspectors find clear evidence of chemical attack Colum Lynch http://www.campus-edge.com and Karen DeYoung A U.N. report doesnt assign blame, but the United States says its findings implicate the Assad government. Costa Concordia is upright after parbuckling completed Max Ehrenfreund The massive shipwreck was rotated back onto its keel after lying half-submerged on its side since last year. But the most remarkable thing about them isnt the national transformation they heralded, urban design experts say: Its their staying power. South Korea today is dominated by tech giants, its streets filled with neon lights, coffee shops and barbecue joints. But despite its first-world status, it hasnt seen a new demand for townhouses, city-center living or artsy warehouse districts. Rather, people still prefer to live in apartments that look nearly unchanged from the boom years units built by Hyundai or Samsung or Lotte, in buildings 15 to 30 stories tall. Although the countrys real-estate market has slowed, apartments form the backbone of preplanned cities under construction, such as Dongtan, where 100 complexes for 310,000 people are being built in a loose ring around a golf course. Apartment buildings are also pushing into some of Seouls classic neighborhoods. A few mid-size cities have mega-towers, 60-some stories high. Some South Koreans say that the apartments have become a symbol of success and that moves into bigger units serve as milestones in their lives. After college: first apartment. After marriage: a bigger apartment. As children grow: a similar apartment in a better school district. The average Korean moves every five years, a steady vertical migration, and about 60percent live in apartments, up from 1percent 40 years ago, according to a recent book, Apartment, written by Park Cheol-soo, a professor at the University of Seoul. Theyre just stacked up Most Korean apartments are rectangular, and few have balconies. Their biggest windows tend to face south or southeast, offering the most sunlight. Most buildings have construction company logos and unit numbers stamped on the sides. They do not rise from the street with businesses in the bottom floor or two. Rather, theyre built in complexes that are strictly residential, with one or two guarded entrances. Only residents or approved visitors may enter. Modern facilities have playgrounds or fitness centers for residents. Koreans arent blind to the downside of such a style. The walled complexes close off large plots of land to the public, and the apartments themselves cut the nation into millions of impersonal cells. At one complex in Jamsil , on the outskirts of Seoul, 19,000 people live in a single city block containing 72 high-rises. There isnt much design inspiration.

After decades of economic growth, South Korea is the land of apartments

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development contracts at 12 apartment buildings in prime central city locations were set to expire, which would allow building owners to convert to market-rate apartments or condominiums . They could boot us to the street or move us to the hinterlands, says Bill Gentile, 65, whos lived in Uptown Tower Apartments on West Burnside Street for nine years. My biggest fear was that I would end up on the street and have to make the best of it. But the Portland Housing Bureau worked with government, private and nonprofit partners over five years to collectively invest $252 million house for rent in fresno to not only preserve low-income statuses for all 12 buildings , but also extend affordable housing agreements to 60 years, per city ordinance . Decades ago, owners entered into low-income housing for tax breaks and government assistance, looking ahead to the payoff of market rate rents in 20 years. So an amalgamation of partners convinced owners to sell and scraped together financing to take over the buildings. Officials say losing the 950 units wouldve been devastating especially since theyre home to seniors, people with disabilities and those with extremely low-incomes. At best residents would have had to move far from services, public transportation, and other amenities in the city center. At worst, theyd end up homeless. Portland’s housing statistics are bleak: The Portland area rental market is one of the tightest in the nation with around 3 percent vacancy, even as newly homeless people are the citys fastest-growing homeless demographic . More than 14 percent of Portlands homeless are 55 or older. We see hundreds of seniors who are sleeping on the streets every year, says Marc Jolin, executive director of JOIN , a nonprofit that helps people living on the street find housing. Having affordable housing targeted at seniors and people with disabilities is absolutely essential. Multnomah County, which best tracks low-income housing, has about 22,990 affordable housing units, amounting to 17 percent of all occupied rentals in the county. Home Forward , the areas housing authority, counts 24,241 people in their subsidized housing; more than half are elderly and/or disabled. Recently JOIN helped a 79-year-old man who was going to commit suicide rather than live on the streets. Now he has an apartment and is back in touch with his kids. The real significance is the people who live in the buildings, says Barbara Shaw, project coordinator for the Portland Housing Bureau effort. Thats the reason its done; thats the reward. 11×13 effort View full size Gabriella Steele, a vivacious 69-year-old who grew up in Italy, says if the 11×13 effort hadn’t preserved her apartment, she’d be homeless. She’s lived at Walnut Park in Northeast Portland for 13 years.Sara Hottman/The Oregonian Beginning in 2008, 20-year HUD contracts for mortgage and rent subsidies at 12 buildings throughout Portland were scheduled to expire over the next five years. Once that happened, building owners could do whatever they wanted with the properties. Seven of the low-income buildings are downtown, where rents are higher and vacancy is lower, about 2.2 percent. A studio on average rents for $856, while a one-bedroom is $1,402, according to the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. Most others are in inner parts of Northwest, Southeast and Northeast, where rents for studios and one-bedrooms are roughly $712 to $1,442, respectively. Building owners started weighing their prospects. Some were independent and interested in selling as quickly as possible, like with the Bronaugh Building on Southwest Morrison. Some had contracts expiring just as new amenities opened near their buildings, making market rates more appealing for the owners, the case with Admiral Apartments by Director Park. Gentile, an Air Force veteran who moved into his affordable apartment after a bad experience with roommates, anticipated the worst: We dont have federal money, we dont have state money, theres just no money, he says. Under Commissioner Nick Fish’s leadership, private and public partners committed to an 11×13 effort ; they hoped to save 11 apartment buildings by 2013. The housing bureau had already kept a twelfth, the 233-unit Rose Schnitzer Tower in Southwest Portland, low-income with a purchase by Cedar Sinai Park . Weve had lots of buildings that changed to market rate for a number of reasons times changed, gentrification, economic growth, Shaw says. Everybody was clear: Those (12) buildings and rent subsidies in particular were resources that needed to be saved. During the next five years, nonprofits and real estate management and development companies, and city, state and federal agencies cobbled together the means to purchase and renovate the buildings as their HUD contracts were set to expire in order to keep the apartments low-income. City ordinance requires building owners to commit to 60 years of affordable housing if they receive city assistance. For example, Gentiles building, Uptown Towers, was saved with a combination of loans, a federal grant, low-income housing tax credit equity, Oregon Housing and Community Service money, a state Business Energy Tax Credit, a city grant, a grant from Enterprise Community Partners, a deferred developer fee, and a weatherization grant. Private and nonprofit funding covered half of the $16.25 million purchase and renovation cost. Now the 12 buildings are owned by limited liability companies or limited partnerships that were sponsored by nonprofits Cedar Sinai Park, REACH Community Development , Northwest Housing Alternatives and Union Labor Retirement Association , and by development firm Guardian Real Estate Services . “We never thought we’d get all (12),” says Fish, housing commissioner for five years. “It was like partnerships on steroids. “It’s the proudest thing I’ve been involved with as housing commissioner.” Gabriella Steele, a vivacious 69-year-old resident at Walnut Park Apartments on Northeast Sixth Avenue who still goes out dancing and sings karaoke, says quality of life has improved since REACH took over her building. Steele, who grew up in Italy, has lived at Walnut Park for 13 years.

In Tysons Corner, rents are down for offices and apartments

Apartment buildings are also pushing into some of Seouls classic neighborhoods. A few mid-size cities have built mega-towers, 60-some stories high. Some South Koreans say that the apartments have become a symbol of success and that moves into bigger units serve as milestones in their lives. After college: a first apartment. After marriage: a bigger apartment. As children grow: a similar apartment in a better school district. The average Korean moves every five years, a steady vertical migration, and about 60 percent live in apartments, up from 1 percent 40 years ago, according to a recent book, Apartment, written by Park Cheol-soo, a professor at the University of Seoul. Most Korean apartments are rectangular, and very few have balconies. Their biggest windows tend to face toward the south or southeast, allowing in the most sunlight. Most buildings have construction company logos and unit numbers stamped onto the sides. They do not rise from the street with businesses in the bottom floor or two. Rather, they are built in complexes that are strictly residential, with one or two guarded entrances. Only residents or approved visitors may enter. Many of the more modern facilities have playgrounds or fitness centers for residents. Koreans are not blind to the downside of such a style. The walled complexes close off large plots of land to the public, and the apartments themselves cut the nation into millions of impersonal cells. At one complex in Jamsil, on the outskirts of Seoul, 19,000 people live in a single city block containing 72 high-rises. There isnt much design inspiration. Theyre just stacked up, said Park In-seok, an architecture professor at Myongji University. He described a paradox in which the apartments are mocked for their appearance but coveted for their convenience. Almost everybody hates the apartment, Park said. But everybody wants to live in one. South Korean society emphasizes the family, not the community, and analysts say the apartments reflect that: The individual units look much nicer than the buildings they are in. Particularly in apartments built since the 1990s, the interiors are comfortable, with wooden floors and stainless-steel kitchens. Outside maintenance is taken care of, and families can focus on their own small spaces. It is convenient, said Kim Sung-jin, an employee at Dell who has lived in three different apartment buildings over the past 17 years. Plus you have a security guard. Theres a parking space for you. Theres a school nearby. The apartments, initially, were a means to hold the nation together during its postwar growth. Government officials sometimes said that if people became dissatisfied with their living situations, they would be likelier to protest against the government, at the time controlled by military leaders. The first apartment buildings, Koreas national housing developer said in the 1960s, would contribute to the aesthetics of the capital city and serve as a useful propaganda tool showing Pyongyang the affluence of the South. Many of South Koreas early apartment designers studied in the United States and were perhaps influenced by the boxy look of standalone suburban homes, some experts say. But they acknowledge that South Koreas apartments have a distinctly communist feel and resemble the units seen in some parts of Moscow. South Korean construction companies try to differentiate their apartment buildings each firm uses its brand name, like the IPark, the Castle but experts admit theres little difference between them. An annual contest is held to pick the best apartment complex constructed within the previous calendar year. Ten urban designers and architects tour the country by bus, inspecting applicants buildings and interviewing residents. One judge says that copycatting is rampant and that modest innovations by one developer are soon adopted by another. Fitness centers. Artificial streams. Underground parking.

Fresno State-Colorado game postponement could cost Bulldogs $340,000

Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Flooding postpones Fresno State-Colorado game Daniel Uthman, USA TODAY Sports 6:04 p.m. EDT September 13, 2013 Rain-swollen Boulder Creek flows around a marker that shows historic flood levels on Friday morning in Boulder, Colo. City officials ordered an evacuation of thousands of residents along the creek the night before. Coffee-colored floodwaters cascaded downstream from the Colorado Rockies on Friday, spilling normally scenic mountain rivers and creeks over their banks and forcing thousands more evacuations. The weather also has postponed Saturday’s football game between Fresno State and Colorado. (Photo: Ben Neary, AP) SHARE 7 CONNECT 8 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE Saturday’s football game in Boulder, Colo., between Fresno State and the University of Colorado has been postponed as the result of disastrous flooding. Colorado Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano made the decision in agreement with Fresno State. A possible make-up date for the non-conference game is being explored. “Even though the weather is improving, Boulder is still designated as a national emergency site,” DiStefano said in a statement. “Our community is hurting. Many of our students are displaced from their homes, including many of our student-athletes. This is not an appropriate time for us to hold a game that would put pressure on the community, both in terms of security/emergency personnel, but also in diverting attention from people in need.” The matchup had been highly anticipated because both teams are 2-0, with Fresno State on the fringes of the top 25 and Colorado off to a positive start under new coach Mike MacIntyre. Fresno State is next scheduled to host Boise State on Sept. 20, and Colorado is scheduled to play at Oregon State on Sept. 28. Colorado’s only remaining open date is Sept. 21, and Fresno State’s is Nov. 16. Boulder and Boulder County have been hit with record rainfall this week. Fresno State coach Tim DeRuyter said through the school, “While we’re disappointed we’re not going to get the opportunity to play against the University of Colorado, we understand the tragic situation there and we send our thoughts and prayers out to the people of Colorado and wish them the best in their recovery efforts.” Senior quarterback Derek Carr added, “First and foremost, safety is most important. This is just a game. The people in Boulder are going through a lot right now, and our prayers go out to them. “The fact that we can’t play a game right now is not a big deal. That is where our team’s mind-set was.” Daniel Uthman, USA TODAY Sports’ senior editor, colleges, is on Twitter @DanUthman . PHOTOS: BEST 10 GAMES OF WEEK 3 Maryland (2-0) at UConn (0-1), 7:30 p.m. ET, ESPN3: Randy Edsall returns to Storrs with the Terps flying high, having scored 90 points through the first two games. Meanwhile, the Huskies lost to FCS Towson in their season opener. USA TODAY Sports

Fresno outdoorsman Shane Krogen dies in fall from helicopter

– The “one woman crime spree” as she’s known to police is in jail for the 36th time this year, all thanks to an alert neighbor in Downtown Fresno. 32-year-old Sarah Magnolia is well known to Fresno police officers. Despite dozens of arrests she keeps being released from an overcrowded Fresno County Jail. Fresno police are hoping to have her held long enough to face a judge for her charges. “I couldn’t believe how many police officers responded to a walk-by theft. So now I understand,” said La Verna Lee. She was stunned to hear the long list of crimes magnolia is accused of committing. She tells Action News she spotted her checking cars along Fulton for an open door. Apparently, she found a Honda Accord unlocked. Lee says Magnolia got in the car, and that’s when she shouted at her from this third house for sale in fresno ca story loft. “She got out of the vehicle, went onto all fours, looked up and me,” she said. “I said I’m calling the cops. And she said ‘I didn’t take anything, I’m so sorry.’” The Honda belongs to Ashley Rendon, who works just feet from where her car was broken into. “I just came out and saw ear phones hanging from it, all my stuff was out,” said Rendon. “She went through everything, but she didn’t take anything.” By this point police say Magnolia is used to being arrested. Records show she’s been taken to jail more than 30 times this year. She also has 19 warrants in her name. “What we’re hoping is she’ll be held accountable for all the other crimes she’s charged with,” said Sgt. Greg Noll of the Fresno Police Department. Once Lee yelled from her upstairs window she says Magnolia ran off. But police caught her just a few blocks away. And it appears she even had time to break into another car. “Turns out she had property in her possession that we believe to be stolen from another vehicle that was unlocked in the 100 block of Echo street,” Sgt. Noll said. Police say they’re not sure of the collective value for the items Magnolia stole. They just hope this arrest will put a stop to her crime spree. Magnolia’s crimes are not considered violent, which is why she’s been released so many times. A Fresno Fire Department official also tells Action News Magnolia stole a fire fighter’s personal car and department issued items that were inside. Related Content

Fresno PD: ‘One woman crime spree’ arrested

Authorities say Krogen, founder and executive director of the High Sierra Volunteer Trail Crew, fell out of a helicopter and died during a marijuana eradication effort in Tulare County on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013. SUSAN BARNETT The Associated Press Story Photos: Search local inventory, coupons and more Powered by By Lewis Griswold The Fresno Bee Shane Krogen, a Fresno outdoorsman who led crews of volunteers through the Sierra Nevada mountains repairing trails and cleaning up marijuana growing sites, died Thursday after falling from a helicopter while in the high country of Tulare County. It’s unclear how Krogen, 57, founder and executive director of the High Sierra Volunteer Trail Crew, fell from the aircraft or whether he was properly restrained. Lt. Patrick Foy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife said he was one of 15 people who hiked into the site and waited for an Air National Guard helicopter to bring in the five-person Trail Crew that included Krogen. Four of the five were hoisted down using a cable attached to their harnesses, but something went wrong when it was Krogen’s turn, Foy said. The accident is under investigation, he said. One DFW officer was at the landing zone when Krogen fell, Foy said. Everyone else heard on their radios that someone was injured and went to help. Foy said Krogen was alive when he reached him, but “I knew he was in bad shape.” The accident happened about 10:10 a.m. Thursday, and it is estimated that Krogen fell about 50 feet, the Tulare County Sheriff’s Department said. The Air National Guard helicopter, from the 129th Rescue Wing at Moffet Field, brought Krogen to Kaweah Delta Medical Center in Visalia, where he was pronounced dead at 11:15 a.m. from blunt force trauma. News of Krogen’s death spread quickly through the Valley’s outdoor community, said Phil Hawkins, a former Trail Crew board member who met Krogen in the early 1980s at a backpacking class that Krogen led. “There is not anybody who owns a pair of hiking boots in Fresno who doesn’t know Shane Krogen,” Hawkins said. Krogen, who started an environmental response team to go with the trail work, was with employees of government agencies helping the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Forest Service clean up an illegal grow site in a remote part of the Sequoia National Forest in the mountains above Springville, officials said. The incident is “under a multiagency investigation,” said a statement by state Fish and Wildlife. It’s the second fatal Sierra accident involving a helicopter crew doing state wildlife agency work in recent years. In January 2010, three agency employees from Fresno plus a contract pilot were killed when their helicopter crashed near Redinger Lake in eastern Madera County. The crew was conducting an aerial deer survey when the helicopter’s main blade struck a grounding wire that was part of a bigger power line. The 2010 crash was a severe blow to the state wildlife agency, and Krogen’s death figures to hit just as hard. He had worked with public lands officials in cleanup operations since 2008. “Shane’s dedication to California’s natural resources was extraordinary,” said Fish and Wildlife Assistant Chief John Baker. “He and his crew have worked tirelessly for several years to maintain access to the high Sierra for all Californians.” Krogen was a popular figure among both California environmentalists and the wildlife agencies his crews assisted. In July, he was quoted in an Associated Press story about volunteers helping the U.S. Forest Service to maintain trails during tight budget times. “Most of us sit at a desk all week and at the end of the week have no tangible outcome for our effort,” he said. “Whether they are cutting out a tree or building rock steps, they have a sense of pride and ownership.” Campers and backpackers in Fresno knew him as the owner of California Outfitters, a store he closed several years ago to devote himself to developing the High Sierra Volunteer Trail Crew, said board member Dave Gilmore. “He believed so firmly in the idea of our public lands,” Gilmore said. “He was a dynamic guy who could persuade you to participate. It’s an absolute tragic loss, but the Trail Crew will survive. We will move forward.” The organization has 800 volunteers, including a group from Ohio, he said. “The Trail Crew was getting ready to take off, his vision was coming to fruition,” said board member and childhood friend Eric Hanson of Fresno. “It’s such an incredible loss for the Valley and anyone who enjoys the Sierra. He dedicated his life to the Sierra.” Krogen, who earned his Eagle Scout award, was a “bubbly, always friendly, always glass half full” kind of person, Hanson said. Besides trail repair and grow-site cleanup, Krogen had a passion for taking schoolchildren from west Fresno on trips to the forest around Huntington Lake to introduce them to the outdoors, Hawkins said. Once, a boy was crying because his mother wouldn’t let him go on the school trip, so Krogen and the principal visited the boy’s mother at home and spent an hour explaining the trip to win her approval, Hawkins said. Krogen is a graduate of Roosevelt High. He is survived by his wife Julie. Funeral arrangements are being made. The reporter can be reached at (559) 441-6104, [email protected] or @fb_LewGriswold on Twitter.

13, 2013. Thousands of people in Colorado were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities. (AP Photo/The Daily Camera, Cliff Grassmick) NO SALES CLIFF GRASSMICK AP Search local inventory, coupons and more National Videos By Robert Kuwada The Fresno Bee Postponing today’s Fresno State-Colorado football game could mean a $340,000 hit to the Bulldogs’ bottom line, but that wasn’t the first thing on school officials’ minds Friday. While historic flooding raged through and around the University of Colorado campus at midday, Fresno State Athletic Director Thomas Boeh said he proposed sending a contingent – including football players – to Boulder to help with recovery. “We thought that would be appropriate, since we kind of have this kinship with them, and we wanted to try to help,” Boeh said. Colorado officials declined the offer. “While we’re disappointed we’re not going to get the opportunity to play against the University of Colorado,” Bulldogs coach Tim DeRuyter said, “we understand the tragic situation there, and we send our thoughts and prayers out to the people of Colorado and wish them the best in their recovery efforts.” Fresno State was left to deal with the financial side of the postponement. For now, the Bulldogs are out the $250,000 that Colorado would have paid them to play the game and still are on the hook for travel expenses, including an air charter, some of which may be unrecoverable. “There’s clearly a business component to everything beyond the humanitarian side, and everybody is realistic about that, and we’ll just do the very best we can that both groups can mitigate the shortcomings we have because of the weather,” Boeh said. “We don’t know exactly what kind of negative financial ramifications there are at this point. We know worst-case scenario, and we need to back off that.” The guaranteed money that was expected from Colorado – the home team typically shares some of the game revenue with the visitor – offsets travel expenses, including air charter, hotel, buses, meals and an equipment truck that traveled midweek to Boulder. What remains is added to the athletic department budget to pay bills. The loss of the guarantee plus the cost of the charter could add up to as much as $340,000, which is not insignificant for a department with a budget of roughly $26 million. Boeh and Colorado officials said they will explore rescheduling the game at some point, but the Bulldogs and Buffaloes do not share an open date on their schedules. Fresno State has a bye week Oct. 12, but Colorado plays at Arizona State that day. The Bulldogs also are off Nov. 16, but Colorado is scheduled to play Cal. The Buffaloes have a bye week Sept. 21, but Fresno State opens conference play against Boise State the day before. Colorado also has an off week Oct. 19, but the Bulldogs are scheduled to host UNLV. The only available open date is Dec. 7, the day of the Mountain West and Pacific 12 conference championship games, but Fresno State is hoping it will be representing the West Division as its champion that day. “We’re going to explore every possibility, like we did for the game – we explored alternate facilities, we explored even bringing the game back here, we looked at the potential for a delay. It’s too bad just the way things worked out: We have a short week and Boise, and they (Colorado) have next week off. “You could have maybe waited a couple of days, a day or two, but I think in the numerous conversations that (Colorado Athletic Director Rick George) and I had, that they had on their campus and the conversations we had on our campus, I think we exhausted every possibility and so now we just have to manage the outcome that couldn’t be avoided and was the appropriate thing to do.” Should the game be canceled, the Bulldogs will have some budget issues, which could be offset with greater attendance at their remaining home games against Boise State, UNLV, Nevada and New Mexico. “Football is your biggest revenue driver, so it stands to reason if you don’t play a football game, that’s going to cause some hardship,” Boeh said. “It is what it is, and it puts things in perspective. It’s a real challenge for us, but it’s not as challenging as what the folks in Colorado are facing in putting their lives together after that kind of devastation. That’s going to take years for them to get back to normal. “The images we’ve seen of the campus and the flooding and knowing that there were fatalities and knowing the kind of distress they’re in, we’re lucky that we’re going to be in sunny skies and a dry environment.” The Associated Press contributed to this report. The reporter can be reached at [email protected] or @rkuwada on Twitter. Read his daily Fresno State updates at fresnobee.com/bulldogs/.

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CU’s AD sure Buffs will make up Fresno game

7 or get a lot of help reworking the schedule from fellow schools in the Mountain West and Pac-12 Conferences. The Buffs and Bulldogs were scheduled to play at Folsom Field on Saturday, but the game was postponed by historic flooding in Boulder after days of heavy rains this week. This much is certain, having to postpone and possibly cancel the game wasn’t good news for a CU athletic department that experienced a $7.5 million shortfall last year because of poor ticket sales in football. CU needs all the revenue it can muster from its flagship program and badly needs to play six home games this fall. Colorado athletic director Rick George and coach Mike MacIntyre sounded optimistic that they will be able to find other a solution that works for the Buffs and Bulldogs, but they didn’t know exactly how Saturday afternoon as they helped feed flood victims on the suite level at Folsom Field. The Buffs have open dates next Saturday and Saturday, Oct. 19. Fresno State has open dates Saturday, Oct. 12 and Saturday, Nov. 16. “We’re looking at all those options,” George said. “I’ve been on the phone all morning and I will continue to be on the phone. We’ll find a solution that works for us and works for Fresno State. They’ve been great to work with. They’ve been fantastic.” However, George did say that if a solution can’t be found, CU could try to schedule a game against another opponent for either its bye week Oct. 19 or some other time. There are two easy fixes. Both teams continue to win and qualify for their conference championships and become bowl eligible, negating the need to make up the game this season. The other option is both teams miss the championship games and the game is held on Saturday, Dec. 7 in Boulder. Obviously everyone prefers the first option, but it’s highly unlikely the Buffs would manage to earn the Pac-12 South Division title after going 1-11 last year, even though they are playing better and off to a 2-0 start. CU would prefer to find a solution that allows the game to be played before the end of the year to ensure a 12-game season and that one team isn’t left with only 11 games if the other qualifies for a conference title game. But it’s going to take a lot of fresno apartment guide cooperation from other programs and conference administrators to pull that off. “We’ll make it up,” MacIntyre said. “There are a lot of things happening on that. The NCAA will jump in. They will make sure. I mean, this is a national disaster. This isn’t just a little thing. We’ll be able to make it up some how some way. “We’ve been talking back and forth. There are teams that can move that have been talking to us. There are all kinds of situations. I’m pretty sure if that didn’t happen, the NCAA would let us play somebody else because we need to be able to get our revenue back and also help the community with the revenue.” Contact staff writer Kyle Ringo at [email protected] or twitter.com/kyleringo .

Where and when Wal-Mart will open in D.C.

(16) , the worlds second-biggest developer by market value, set a lower sales target for this year and said it will build more small apartments as Hong Kong stepped up measures to curb prices. The builder plans to sell HK$28 billion ($3.6 billion) of homes in Hong Kong and mainland China in the year through June 2014, Deputy Managing Director Victor Lui said at a briefing in the city yesterday. That compares with home sales of HK$32.9 billion a year earlier, the company said. Hong Kong builders are selling the fewest homes in more than four years after the government in February imposed its toughest measures yet to rein in prices that Savills Plc (SVS) says are now the worlds highest. Sun Hung Kai is considering selling more offices, small shopping malls and carpark spaces over the coming year to make up for slowing home sales, Lui said at the briefing after the company announced full-year earnings. Im a bit disappointed, said Alfred Lau, a Hong Kong-based analyst at Bocom International Holdings Co. It seems like the sales pace will slow quite substantially and the company is still trying to figure out what to do under all these uncertainties. The Hong Kong-based company said underlying profit, or net income excluding property revaluations, declined to HK$18.6 billion for the 12 months ended June 30 from HK$21.7 billion a year earlier. That compares with the HK$19.6 billion mean estimate of 20 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg News . Sun Hung Kais shares fell 1.3 percent to HK$101.80 as of 9:56 a.m. local time, extending their decline this year to 12 percent. That compares with a 5 percent drop this year in the Hang Seng Property Index, which tracks nine of the citys biggest developers including the company. Biggest Investment Of the HK$28 billion sales target for the year, HK$19 billion will be in Hong Kong and HK$9 billion in mainland China, where the company had land reserves of more than 81.1 million square feet at the end of June. Lui said the developer will slow down property sales, without specifying the number of units it plans to sell during the year at the briefing. Sun Hung Kai this month paid a record 21.8 billion yuan ($3.6 billion) for a commercial site in Shanghai . The acquisition is the biggest ever investment by the company, which expects to generate HK$20 billion from selling 40 percent of the project, Co-chairman Thomas Kwok said at the briefing. Sun Hung Kai will sell more medium- and small-sized apartments as demand from end-users outstrips that from investors seeking luxury units, Kwok said. We have to follow the shifting demand in the market, said Kwok. The demand for luxury homes moves in cycles and we always need to look at where we are. Home Prices The company, which focuses on luxury homes, has benefited from an influx of wealthy mainland Chinese buyers over the past decade, which helped Hong Kong home prices to more than double since early 2009. Hong Kongs government defines a luxury residential unit as one with an area of at least 100 square meters (1,076 square feet). Those units account for about 7.7 percent of the citys 1.1 million privately built homes at the end of 2012, according to government statistics. Home prices have fallen about 2 percent since peaking in March. Leung Chun-ying, who took over as the citys leader in July 2012, in February doubled stamp-duty taxes on all real estate transactions, after having imposed extra taxes on non-resident buyers earlier. Property Sales The developer, controlled by the family of co-chairmen Thomas and Raymond Kwok , sold more than 1,100 apartments in the city for about HK$12.2 billion in the first half of the 2013 calendar year, according to figures compiled by realtor Centaline Property Agency Ltd. Developers sold about 4,300 units in the first half, the fewest since the second half of 2008, when homebuyers were deterred by the global credit crisis. For the fiscal year ended June 30, profit from property sales fell to HK$7.2 billion from HK$13.1 billion a year earlier, the company said. Hong Kong builders begin selling apartments while theyre still in construction and book profit upon completion. Rental Income Net rental income at the developer, which owns the International Finance Centre office and mall complex, and the International Commerce Centre, Hong Kongs tallest building, rose 11 percent to HK$12.2 billion, Sun Hung Kai said. Thomas and Raymond Kwok each have a net worth of $8.6 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. The brothers and two other men are charged with conspiring to provide payments, loans and free use of apartments totaling more than HK$35 million to the citys former No. 2 official Rafael Hui, according to court documents. They were first arrested in March last year and will next appear in court in May 2014. The brothers have denied any wrongdoing.

The garden-style apartments of yesteryear are out. To appeal to “ echo boomers ,” roughly defined as people born in the 1980s and early 1990s, the new urban apartment buildings offer smaller living quarters and grand common areas where renters can entertain and socialize. At the Savoye , an apartment complex near Dallas that caters to younger renters, the amenities include a resort-style pool surrounded by high-end lounge chairs lined up under oversized umbrellas. There are stainless-steel barbecue grills and an outdoor table with water streaming down the middle and ending in a waterfall. There’s also a posh poker lounge, a private movie room and a banquet room. Find quality rentals in your area Echo boomers “want large communal spaces where they can gather with their friends and neighbors,” says Jerry Davis, a senior vice president at Denver-based UDR Inc., which developed the 392-unit Savoye last year and is working on a second phase of the complex, which will have 347 units. In addition, UDR is building four other communities for echo boomers across the country. There are about 80 million echo boomers, says Marcus & Millichap, a real-estate investment brokerage firm. By 2020, the 18-to-34-year-old age group, considered the prime renting age, will grow by an additional 5 million. Developers are betting that instead of rushing to buy a condo, this group would rent for several years. Other monthly obligations $ Cash for down payment $ The Census Bureau says the homeownership rate for people under 35 was 37.9% in the first quarter of this year, down from 38.9% in the first quarter of 2010 and 43.3% in 2005’s first quarter. The Brooklyner in New York, owned by Chicago-based Equity Residential, offers a rooftop sun deck with sweeping city views and a lounge featuring a pool table and Skee-ball . The Monterey by Windsor, a 371-unit building owned by Windsor Communities in Dallas’ trendy West Village area, boasts an outdoor fireplace, kitchen and large flat-screen television in a space large enough to entertain 50 people. Article continues below “The style of the building was something that we really liked,” says Michelle Malpica-Hertsgaard, 30, at the Monterey, which opened in early 2009. “It’s not so stark, like a normal apartment.” More results from Bing: web | videos | images Demand up, supply lags During the housing boom, waves of renters left apartments to become homeowners, including many young people. When the boom turned to bust, some homeowners became renters again. But developers had a hard time finding financing to construct new buildings to meet the growing demand. In the first quarter, some 6,000 new units hit the market, the lowest quarterly figure since research firm Reis Inc. began publishing quarterly data in 1999. Read: Vacationing this summer? Sublet your pad and save some dough As a result, occupancy and rent levels have been rising. Just 6.2% of apartment units were vacant in the first quarter of this year, down from 8% a year earlier, Reis says. The first quarter’s effective rent for one-bedroom apartments, or what’s paid after special offers, came in at $983, up from $960 a year earlier. Now that view website the credit freeze is thawing, builders are ramping up construction. But with more than 225,000 new apartments expected by 2013 more than double the number delivered in 2010 it isn’t clear whether developers are bringing on too much supply in areas such as Houston, Atlanta and Austin, Texas, especially on the high end. Too much competition could force landlords to chop rents. These pricey pads are also highly sensitive to the economy: If layoffs increase or job creation stalls, existing and potential tenants could downgrade to cheaper units. Slide show: 10 cities where rents are rising the most “The risk is that the new product is more expensive than the typical first-time renter can afford,” says Hessam Nadji, a Marcus & Millichap managing director. But developers say they aren’t worried. Millions of young people moved back home or sought roommates to cut costs following the financial crisis, and now they are moving out on their own again. “The last generation thought of renting as a stopover,” Nadji says. “Young renters want to be mobile, they want to be flexible in moving to chase a job, and they don’t feel as much societal pressure toward ownership.” Downsizing trend Although attractive entertainment space in common areas is important, individual apartments are getting smaller. In the late 1990s, one-bedroom units measured about 900 square feet, compared with about 750 square feet today. Slide show: Make your rental your own Equity Residential, one of the nation’s largest apartment owners, is considering one-bedrooms measuring about 500 square feet. Mark Humphreys, whose firm, Humphreys & Partners Architects LP, designed the Monterey, says he thinks he could shave http://www.campus-edge.com another 50 square feet. “The fact that the unit is smaller is not really a big deal because (renters are) not spending a lot of time in their apartment,” he says. ‘Listed’: How rooms appear and disappear in a 258-square-foot apartment About a year ago, Jordan Roberts looked at 15 apartments in the Dallas area, but she picked the Monterey, even though the units there were smaller than some of the apartments she had toured. Bedroom size didn’t matter because “I’m in there to sleep and that’s about it,” says Roberts, a 21-year-old Southern Methodist University student. Roberts, who says she pays about $960 a month, says that the Monterey’s pool was a big selling point. Although extras such as lounge areas and movie rooms cost developers millions of dollars, they think the investment will pay off. Peter Donovan, senior managing director of CB Richard Ellis’ multihousing group, says that most developers are looking to get a 6.5% to 8% return on total construction costs.

3,600 apply for 122 new Arlington apartments

3,600 apply for 122 new Arlington apartments Patricia Sullivan/The Washington Post – Construction crews continue to work on building the Arlington Mill Residences at Columbia Pike and Dinwiddie St. in Arlington on Friday. By Patricia Sullivan , E-mail the writer In a display of the demand for affordable housing in Northern Virginia, more than 3,600 people have applied for a chance to rent one of 122 new affordable apartments still under construction along Arlington Countys Columbia Pike. The volume of applicants surprised even the nonprofit developer of the Arlington Mill Residences. Hundreds of people were expected to seek a spot in the complex via lottery, but on the first of four days that the waiting list was open, they began lining up before dawn. By 6 p.m., 949 people had applied. Nina Janopaul, president and chief executive of nonprofit developer Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing, called the outpouring of interest a case of a dramatic rise in demand for affordable housing in the close-in area. The new construction on Columbia Pike, next to a new community center, she said, proved highly desirable. The increasing cost of living in the inner suburbs, especially in northern Virginia, has taken a significant toll on the number of apartments considered affordable to families. In 2000, about 20,000 of the 35,000 rental apartments in Arlington were ranked as market-rate affordable; now, only 6,000 of the countys 43,000 rentals are. Those who lined up early last week for the chance at the new apartments attested to the difficulty of finding affordable rentals. I pay $1,600 for a one-bedroom on the west end of Columbia Pike, said Senait Worku, a coffee shop cashier who works two jobs, as does her husband. We have lived here seven years, and we want to try for lower rents. Among the taxi drivers, computer techs and disabled senior citizens, a pregnant Melkam Tebeje turned up at the rental office with several members of her family. We need to have an apartment without paying a lot of money, she said. An Alexandria grocery store cashier, Tebeje said she cant save for school because her rent is so high. If I get one of these [apartments], I can go to school, too, but now I dont have time because I work two jobs. The four-story apartment building, at 901 S. Dinwiddie St. just behind the newly opened Arlington Mill Community Center, will be affordable to people or families earning less than 60percent of the areas median income, which would mean a family of four with an income of $64,000 or less could qualify. Most of the apartments have two or three bedrooms. A dozen of the units will be set aside for those with very low incomes, and another dozen are wheelchair-accessible apartments. A wing with eight efficiency units has been set aside for those who are the very hardest to house, such as the homeless, APAH officials said. APAHs Janopaul said the high demand is not restricted to Arlington Mill. We have a huge waiting list at our Parc Rosslyn [building], but they didnt apply all at once, she said. Local and state governments have been trying to subsidize the creation and preservation of apartments for area residents, because pushing the non-affluent to outer suburbs exacerbates the Washington areas traffic congestion and because many communities value a mix of people who earn a variety of incomes. The $31million Arlington Mill Residences are being financed with an $8.9million loan from Virginias low-income housing finance agency, and with $22million in federal tax credit housing money from Bank of America. It sits atop a parking garage, built with a loan from Arlington County thats since been repaid. The property is on land owned by the county and APAH has a discounted 75-year lease. The demand for the rentals is amazing, no question about it, said J. Walter Tejada (D), chairman of the Arlington County Board, who made increasing affordable housing the boards top priority this year. At the same time, it doesnt surprise me. It validates the challenge that we recognize and we have to meet… . These are not giveaways. We make loans, we work with developers this is how we do affordable housing in Arlington. Half of all four-person family households in the Washington region this year earned more than $107,500; half earned less, including beginning teachers, police and firefighters, retail employees, construction workers and many professionals. Most are priced out of the home-purchase market and often struggle to find adequate rental housing. The average rent in Arlington last year ranged from $1,422 per month for an efficiency to $2,782 for a three-bedroom unit, the county reported, rising 13 percent from 2011.

New apartments adapt to renters’ changing tastes

commentPeriod:14! commentEndDate:9/26/13 10:45 EDT! currentDate:9/12/13 8:0 EDT! allowComments:true! displayComments:true! Where and when Wal-Mart will open in D.C. By Jonathan O’Connell , E-mail the writer With Mayor Vincent Grays decision to veto legislation that would have required Wal-Mart to pay its workers in the District well above the minimum wage, the retailer is moving ahead with plans to open at least five stores in the city. Three stores are under construction already and two others are in advanced stages of planning. Wal-Mart still wants to open a store at the corner of New York Avenue and Bladensburg Road in Northeast D.C., but a developers plan to build a shopping center there has fallen apart . Mike DeBonis Debate on D.C. proposal has polarized local leaders while focusing national attention on low retail wages. Barring an overturn of the mayors veto by the council, here is where and when the D.C. Wal-Mart stores would open, along with some details about what the new stores would offer: Georgia Avenue Location: 5968 Georgia Ave. NW, in Ward 4. Status: Under construction with opening in end of 2013 or early 2014. Store specs: 103,000-square-foot store with 2,500 square feet of other retail, underground parking, rain garden, green roof, Capital Bikeshare station and electric car plug-in. Offerings: General merchandise (apparel, electronics, toys, sporting goods, health/ beauty), groceries and pharmacy. Developer: Foulger-Pratt. Location: 99 H St. NW, in Ward 6. Status: Under construction with opening in end of 2013 or early 2014. Store specs: 80,000-square-foot store beneath 300 apartments with another 20,000 square feet of retail, 373 underground parking spaces, Capital Bikeshare station and electric car plug-in. Offerings: Groceries, bakery, deli, pharmacy, merchandise including apparel and electronics. Developer: JBG. Location: Riggs Road and South Dakota Avenue NE, in Ward 4. Status: Under construction with opening in 2015. Store specs: 120,000-square-foot store along with 345 apartments, 20,000 square feet of additional retail and underground parking. Offerings: General merchandise (apparel, electronics, toys, sporting goods, health/beauty), groceries, pharmacy. Developer: JBG. Location: East Capitol and 58th Streets NE, in Ward 7. Status: Developer has requested zoning changes. Earliest opening 2015. Store specs: 118,000-square-foot store alongside other stores, 283 apartments and a small office building. Offerings: General merchandise (apparel, electronics, toys, sporting goods, health/beauty), groceries, pharmacy. Developer: D.C. Housing Authority and A&R Cos. Location: Good Hope Road and Alabama Avenue SE., in Ward 7. Status: Developer plans to fresno housing near fresno state request zoning changes. Earliest opening 2016. Store specs: 120,000-square-foot store alongside 270 apartments in first phase.

Senate President Franklin Drilon is ex-officio CA chairman, with Samar Rep. Mel Senen Sarmiento as vice chairman. Ilocos Norte Rep. Rodolfo Farinas is majority leader, with Zamboanga del Norte Rep. Rosendo Labadlabad as assistant majority leader. Sen. Juan Ponce Enrile was chosen minority leader, with Isabela Rep. Rodolfo Albano III as assistant minority leader. Albano also heads the ethics committee. Chosen committee chairmen were Rep. Labadlabad for accounts, Sen. Antonio Trillanes IV for agrarian reform, Cavite Rep. Roy Loyola for agriculture, Sen. Vicente Sotto for budget and management, Sen. Teofisto Guingona III for constitutional commissions, Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano for education, Sen. Serge Osmena for energy, Sen. Loren Legarda for environment and natural resources, Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago for foreign affairs, and Sen. Ralph Recto for finance. The appointments commission is scheduled to tackle today some promotions in the military. Four Cabinet appointments are still pending: those of Justice Secretary Leila de Lima, Social Welfare Secretary Corazon Soliman, Energy Secretary Jericho Petilla, and Environment Secretary Ramon Paje. Other appointments that the CA would consider are those of Armed Forces of the Philippines chief of staff Lt. Gen. Emmanuel Bautista, Commissioners Luie Guia, Grace Padaca and Al Parreno of the Commission on Elections, Civil Service Commissioner Nieves Osorio, and Commission on Audit Commissioners Heidi Mendoza and Rowena Guanzon. The CA has bypassed De Lima, house for rent by owner Soliman and Paje several fresno luxury housing times. Also bypassed a few times was Mendoza. CA members identified with Vice President Jejomar Binay blocked her confirmation. Binay had accused Mendoza of supposedly allowing herself to be used by his political enemies to destroy him. Mendoza had written audit reports that were unfavorable to Binay and his wife when they separately led Makati as mayor. Binays wife is facing a Sandiganbayan case in connection with alleged financial irregularities when she was mayor.

Micro-apartments: The anti-McMansions

(American News Photo by John Davis / September 1, 2013) Related By Jeff Bahr, [email protected] American News September 2, 2013 The new Roosevelt Apartment project will feature 32 apartments, none of which are the same. Some of the apartments also aren’t what the developers expected. Adjustments were made as they went along, said Jack Hollinsworth of Roosevelt Apartments LLC, which is transforming the old Roosevelt Junior High into an apartment building. In the end, the building will include three efficiency units, 16 two-bedroom and two three-bedroom apartments. The rest will be a bedroom and a half or two bedrooms and a half, said Hollinsworth, the owner of JDH Construction. Read the Farm Forum classifieds updated daily. >> As he gave a tour of a three-bedroom apartment, he noted that it had two bathrooms one upstairs and one downstairs. The whole building won’t be done, but the first tenants will move into the brick structure in early October. An open house is scheduled for Sept. 18. The project received help from the people of Aberdeen, Hollinsworth said, so the public should have an opportunity to see what we’ve been up to.“ A tax increment financing district paid $1.5 million toward the schools adaptive reuse. Hollinsworth said his company is investing about $1.2 million. So the total cost of the project is about $2.7 million. Work on the school remodeling began in January. The project’s architect is Ciavarella Design of Mitchell. New windows began arriving Thursday, and about 15 had been installed by Friday morning. The window installation will continue for no more than two weeks, Hollinsworth said. The former school, which was part of the old Aberdeen Central complex, was remodeled in 1977. The workers removed the ceiling tile from each room, so the original ceiling heights have been restored. People who tour the building are impressed by the high ceilings, Hollinsworth said. He said the building will be unique for Aberdeen, saying its more of a downtown Minneapolis, Sioux Falls, New York-type deal. Its strengths, he said, include a good security system and its location. The building is close to Kessler’s and Avera St. Lukes Hospital and downtown is only about three blocks away, he noted. Depending on your faith, you might be able to walk to church. Also close are the Aberdeen Recreation and Cultural Center and Alexander Mitchell Public Library. About a dozen of the units will contain lofts. Large, tall windows will provide plenty of light. Giving the tour of the property, Hollinsworth pointed to a bedroom that will have three windows. The efficiency apartments will cost $400 or $500 a month, Hollinsworth said. The highest rent for a three-bedroom apartment will be $1,150. In between are the one-bedroom units, which will go for about $640 a month, and the two-bedroom units, priced around $800. People showing an interest range from their 70s and 80s to college students. If three students share a three-bedroom apartment, Hollinsworth said, the price isn’t bad. Because the old school is on the National Register of Historic Places, the South Dakota State Historical Society was involved in its renovation. But the people from Pierre were good to work with, he said. There were things that we had to go and get their approval on, he said. That process just took a little time. Copyright 2013, Aberdeen News

Apartments focus of controversy in Dunwoody

Typically ranging between 180 and 300 square-feet, these tiny apartments are becoming increasingly popular among the young-and-single set and even some retirees, seeking affordable places to live in the nation’s costliest cities. Nowhere is the micro trend hotter than in Seattle. More than 40 micro-apartment developments have been built in the city in the past three years, according to Jim Potter, chairman of Kauri Group, a Seattle-based developer. Many of these apartment buildings offer shared patios, roof decks and even communal kitchens. (Zoning laws in Seattle allow up to eight apartments to share one kitchen). Other emerging micro-apartment hotspots include San Francisco, Boston, Providence, R.I., New York and Portland, Ore., where Kauri is building a new complex. The key selling point is affordability. In Seattle , 250-square-foot apartments rent for under $800 a month, almost half the average $1,400 people pay for newly built studios of 400 square feet or more in the city, according to Potter. Related: Inside the ultimate man cave In San Francisco, Patrick Kennedy of micro-apartment developer Panoramic Interests, rents 295-square-foot apartments for $1,600, about a third less than the going rate for newly built studios in the area. Living in tiny spaces requires big lifestyle adjustments. When Aron Susman moved his commercial real estate information company, TheSquareFoot, from Houston to New York , the 30-year-old bachelor went from a 1,700-square-foot apartment to just over 200 square feet. “At first, it was shocking,” he said. “I had a closet in Houston that, I swear, was bigger than my whole apartment now. It causes you to go out and do things. I spend less time in my apartment.” He is able to walk to his office where he usually works late. During the evenings, he often meets up with friends, most of whom live in the neighborhood. Related: Cities with the best parks New York has always been known for its shoebox-sized apartments. But its mayor, Michael Bloomberg, wants to add to the stock of small apartments. He recently sponsored a micro-apartment design competition aimed at combating the city’s shortage of affordable places for its one- and two-person households. In some Manhattan neighborhoods, upwards of 70% of households consist of singles or couples, according to Eric Bunge, a partner in of nARCHITECTS. The city recently awarded Bunge’s firm a contract to develop a complex of 55 micro-apartments ranging from 250- to 370-square feet. When it opens in 2015, it will be the first micro-apartment complex built in Manhattan since 1955, when the city banned new studios of under 400 square feet. Rents will probably be in the low $2,000s and the building will offer communal living areas, including dens, a rooftop garden, and a fitness room, he said. Related: 10 big, booming cities Many modern micro-apartments have innovative, efficient designs marked by flexible features. Dining room tables turn into beds. Excess vertical spaces hold shelves. Banquette lids open for storage space. Panaromic’s recently completed 23-unit building includes a “Murphy Bed” that flips up and leaves a dining table behind that can seat five people, a work area, storage, exterior space, and Internet access – all within 295 square feet. The kitchens have refrigerators, dishwashers and microwaves, but no conventional ovens. Related 10 most polluted cities Somewhat surprisingly, many seniors have moved into the new micro-apartments, said Potter. These empty-nesters seek to downsize from their full-sized homes, looking for an affordable, less high maintenance option. No matter what your age, micro-apartments can take some getting used to – unless you’re already living in tight quarters. “We had a Japanese newspaper come and write a story about our apartments,” said Kennedy. “Their conclusion was ‘This is not a small space.’”

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Hajj mismanagement: Pilgrims allotted apartments far removed from Haram Sharif

(WSAZ) People who were displaced from their apartment building after last weeks thunderstorm microburst tore off the roof of the complex may not be heading home for several more weeks. Doug Queen, the landlord of the Castle Apartments along Winchester Avenue in Ashland, said he hopes to have the building reopened by Oct. 1 so the 32 people who are staying in motels or with relatives can move back home. Two of the apartments, you could see the sky from them. All that will have to be redone. Where there was water damage it was a heavy rain that night, before we could get it covered up, Queen said. Some electrical problems caused by the storm, which will have to be fixed. Queen said that the hole in the buildings roof has been sealed. While not all of the 17 units in the building were damaged, all of the tenants had to move out until the building could be completely fixed. Many of the people living there are now staying eight blocks away at the Ashland Inn. Donald Martin said the Red Cross told him and his neighbors it would pay for the first month and deposit of their hotel stay. It’s been bad cause I lost my place, lost a place to stay and been in a motel room, Martin said. And I’m broke too, so it makes it worse. Martin said he had no clothes with him other than what he was wearing because all of his belongings were still in his apartment unit. He said his apartment was not among those damaged in last weeks storms. On Monday, Queen went around to some of the tenants who are now staying at the Ashland Inn to talk to them about what they planned to do. They had like four days left on the rent from last month, so I’m seeing who wants their money back for that amount, or if they want to come back, just apply it to next month’s rent, Queen said. The tenants have had a big challenge, being moved around, but the Red Cross takes care of them. The local church has provided food for them. Queen said he has spoken to electricians and contractors about setting up temporary electric service. He noted that he has yet to hear back from the insurance company. When asked how his tenants were handling this situation, Queen said most were doing well. Everybody realizes, you know, what problems there are and it just takes time, Queen said. While there is insurance on the building, it does not cover individual apartment units. Keep clicking on WSAZ.com for the latest information. UPDATE 8/29/13 @ 11:30 a.m. ASHLAND, Ky. (WSAZ) – First came the rains, then a brief moment of high winds that forced more than 30 people out of their apartments Wednesday night. The Castle Apartments in Ashland, KY took a direct hit from the high winds of the storms that moved through the area. There are 17 apartments in the building located in 2300 block of Winchester Avenue. Half the roof on the building was ripped off, along with a large porch area that was destroyed. James Flora has lived in the apartments for 14 years and says when he came out and saw the damage he feared the worst. “What was your biggest fear? That we’d find casualties but we didn’t, thank God on that,” said Flora. The Red Cross is housing residents at the Ashland Inn until people find a place to live. Officials are now inspecting the apartments to see if the overall structure is safe or if it will need to be torn down. Keep clicking on WSAZ.com for the latest information. ORIGINAL STORY 8/28/13 11 p.m. ASHLAND, Ky. (WSAZ) – Strong thunderstorms moved through parts of the region Wednesday evening, falling trees and knocking out power – even blowing a roof off an apartment complex in the 2200 block of Winchester Avenue in Ashland, Boyd County 911 dispatchers say. Boyd County 911 dispatchers say the city of Ashland appeared to be the hardest hit. There were reports of trees down throughout the city. Flooding was not an issue there, though. AEP was reporting a little more than 250 customers without power in Boyd County just after the storm. The incident at the apartment complex in Ashland left some families homeless. In Lawrence County, Ohio, several trees were reported down, but there were no reports of high water or roads closed. There were 1,145 AEP customers in Lawrence County, Ohio, without power, according to AEP’s website. As of late Wednesday night, power had been restored to most residents.

Modesto apartments come at costly price to taxpayers

In fact, some say the city didnt regret anything; pushing out the residents, they say, was the plans selling point. It was a twofer: Get rid of the apartment people and also get parks, said Bob Lundsten, a Dunwoody activist who opposed the plan and who works for DeKalb Countys only Republican county commissioner. I know buzz words and code words when I hear them. A federal lawsuit filed by the apartment owners in July alleges the same thing: That Dunwoody violated the Fair Housing Act by waging a campaign to force the ouster of residents from two apartment complexes, who are predominantly members of minority groups including over 500 school age children. The suit alleges that after Dunwoody voters defeated the $66 million bond issue, the city besieged the complexes on the eastern edge of the city with hundreds of code violations and unreasonable work deadlines to drive the owners out of business. Pushing the residents out of the affordable housing rents average about $700 would leave many without options for affordable housing nearby, the suit states. City officials, citing the lawsuit, would not comment for this story. But former city officials and other community leaders say the plan was simply a new citys effort to improve quality of life by providing green space in a family-oriented suburban area desperate for recreation space. Robert Wittenstein, a city councilman defeated in the 2011 election when voters shot down the bond issue, said Dunwoody was sincere in wanting to help those in the apartments. We understood there was a disruption here; there were loud critics, he said. Its not coded language. Its us saying we know we have an obligation here and we want to help. Apartments are often a lightning rod in local politics, drawing concern and opposition from neighborhood groups and politicians. Wrapped up in the ensuing debate, Lundsten said, is a often a quiet understanding that the term apartment residents is a euphemism for low-income people or minorities. The discussion is often peppered with talk about crime, as it was in the Dunwoody referendum. And its not just Dunwoody. The Sandy Springs city council last year spent a good amount of time and effort talking about crime and apartments. The council has supported a redevelopment project on the citys south border to demolish older apartments and replace them with higher-rent units. Those involved in such discussions try mightily to avoid terms of class, culture and race. The minutes of a 2012 Sandy Springs city council work session sums up Mayor Eva Galambos take on the issue: One reason for the apartment inspections is the crime rate. Crime is a reflection of too many people living too close to each other, resulting in fights. Sandy Springs police chief told the council 36 percent of the citys crime, and 58 percent of its violent offenses, came from the 71 apartment complexes. Census figures show more than half of Sandy Springss housing units are multi-unit. Former State Sen. Dan Weber, a leader in Dunwoodys 2008 incorporation, wrote a letter to the editor before the 2011 election saying the aging apartment complexes had a disproportionately high percentage of the citys gang activity, problems that bled over to local schools. He said 40 percent of the citys population lives in apartments, adding that research shows property values decline if a community reaches 50 percent apartments. About $19 million from the bond issue was to purchase and demolish the 519-unit Dunwoody Glen apartments and use the 42 acres for a sports complex. The 266-unit Lacota Apartments next door was to be razed and replaced with owner-occupied units. The most viable option for these projects seems to be in the minority areas; they often seem to be most expendable, said Lyonel LaGrone, homes for rent in fresno enforcement director of Metro Fair Housing Services, a non-profit that investigates housing discrimination compaints, but is not a party to the Dunwoody issue. Wittenstein said Dunwoodys first proposed boundaries did not include land where those apartments were, but he and others worked to bring them into the new city. The move was both idealistic and realistic, he said. We worked to be inclusive; that area had long been ignored by DeKalb, he said. We recognized there was a problem with those apartments. They needed to be livable. Part of it was a realization that crime doesnt know boundaries, Wittenstein said. Itd be better for us to take responsibility for codes enforcement and police. We didnt want the blight to spread to surrounding areas. Dunwoody officials said Dunwoody Glen has had 424 incidents requiring police reports since April 2009 and Lacota has had 340. Dunwoody Glen has had and 1,331 codes violations and Lacota 1,198. Kathy Zickert, a zoning attorney who represents the apartment owners, said the citys effort is not hidden. They stand up at meetings and say We want to get rid of apartments in the city. Theyre using (the referendum and codes enforcement) as a tool to get rid of undesirables. Its rare a politician will say, Lets get rid of the black people. You look for code language. You see it here. Dunwoody Homeowners Association president Stacey Harris has heard those arguments but doesnt believe they were the goals of the city or its residents. No one ever said they were voting for the bonds to get rid of the apartments.

6 Couches For Small Apartments That Will Actually Fit In Your Space (PHOTOS)

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Home at last: Crawford Apartments to open this month

PHILADELPHIA, PA, August 31, 2013 /24-7PressRelease/ – Pomona West Apartments applaud a recent article in The Huffington Post that provides helpful tips for individuals organizing their first apartment. The off-campus housing community leaders treat college students more like residents rather than tenants. Pomona West Apartments adopts a community-centered approach to off-campus housing, which is why the apartments are viewed more like a family than an apartment complex. Not only does the staff at the off-campus housing community allow students to have pets and decorate their units to their liking, the team of professionals embraces it. The staff fosters individuality, allowing students to have the rental properties fresno ca freedom to decorate. The team appreciates every resident’s unique sense of style, and the personnel encourages students to soak up the most of their college experience by exploring their individuality and decorating their own oasis at Pomona West Apartments that is both comfortable and convenient. The staff at the off-campus housing community knows that it is often difficult for college students on a budget to put the time and resources into their units, making the space as cozy and personalized as possible. Unfortunately, students in dorms and occasionally apartments resort to crammed spaces due to inefficient organization. They are so busy cultivating relationships and studying for finals that decorating and organizing their own space often gets put on the backburner. The team at the apartments wants students to thrive in their academic lives, but also in their personal lives. They encourage residents to make their units as comfortable as possible, which often means taking the time to organize their first apartment. The report notes, “Moving from a dorm room to an apartment is a large project. When you live in the dorms, your space is usually very limited, you share a bathroom with numerous other students and you cannot put nails in or paint your walls. An apartment offers freedom for creation; there are more rooms to decorate and to personalize. It is easy to take advantage of the sudden increase in space that comes with an apartment; however, it is important to keep organized.” The team at Pomona West Apartments wholeheartedly concurs with this statement. “It is an overwhelming project to move from a dorm into an apartment. Many residents are happy to make the switch to more spacious rooms, but often, they don’t utilize the rooms as best they can because they don’t take organization into consideration. Effectively organizing can make a room much more conducive to studying or entertaining guests, and a cleaner, well organized room usually helps residents feel less stressed throughout the day or evening,” said a staff person. The article recommends placing a high priority on organizing the living room, as it is the main guest entertaining area. Putting keys on hooks by the front door will keep items like keys or purses from littering the ground or getting lost, an instant stress-reliever. The article also mentions that a mail divided in a desk organizer by the door is a helpful item to have: “Living in an apartment means keeping track of bills, and this keeps our bills and important documents in one place.” To keep postcards and other cards in one spot, the article advises new tenants to hang a piece of twine between two pictures hanging on the wall: “Not only is this useful, but it also adds a decorative element to our living room.” The team at Pomona West Apartments believes that personalization is key, and hanging postcards, photographs and posters are all excellent ways to customize a space. “The trick is to make sure you don’t make it too cluttered,” said a staff person. “Don’t cover the walls completely, or the room will appear smaller. But it is a great idea to put little motivators and reminders all around you to foster a more creative, positive place – whether that’s your family and friends, favorite places or music, etc.” In the bedroom, the article suggests keeping school supplies in a container under the bed and purchasing a closet space saver shelf. The team at Pomona West Apartments finds that multi-purpose furniture is a great idea for first-time apartment tenants, such as a trunk as a coffee table that also has storage. ABOUT: Pomona West Apartments is a premier off-campus housing community that aims to make every resident feel at home. The apartments are conveniently located near Chico State University and Butte College, and the community is also known as a pet-friendly space. The apartments have a spacious dog park on the property, and there are many activities and amenities available to college students. The apartments are extremely different from other off-campus housing solutions, mainly because of the staff’s effort to create community, comfort and convenience above all else. — Press release service and press release distribution provided by http://www.24-7pressrelease.com # # #

UPDATE: Neighbors Displaced for Several More Weeks after Storms Damage Apartment Building

It was Sydney’s most highly anticipated apartment launch since Bennelong 20 years ago. And, unless someone knocks something else down, the last CBD waterfront development ever. The sell-out came on the same day that Sydney recorded a weekend auction clearance rate of 84 per cent – the highest for the year. “With 550 auctions, it was the second biggest auction day of the year,” the senior economist at Australian Property Monitors, Dr Andrew Wilson, said. “How hot can this market get?” Great place to be: Buyer Chris Donohue with his son Max. Photo: Jacky Ghossein Fund manager Chris Donohue, 42, of Neutral Bay and his son, Max, 6, were among the first to arrive in the Barangaroo display suite and snapped up a one-bedder as an investment. “Not just because of the view in front of you, but there are going to be about 25,000 office workers and they’re going to be brand new buildings as well. An artist’s impressions of the interiors of the Cloud apartments at Barangaroo. ’’Whether you live here or rent it out to other office workers, it’s a great investment or a great place to be.” Developers Lend Lease and agents CBRE refused to confirm the total value of the apartments sold but with one-bedders at $1 million, two-bedders at $2 million and three-bedders at $3 million, on my calculations total sales exceeded $300 million. Apart from the $10.5 million paid for the two-level four-bedroom penthouse in a section of the Anadara block known as The Cloud, the sub-penthouse also sold for $7.5 million. An artist’s impressions of the exteriors of the Barangaroo apartments. Across Anadara and the other block, Alexander, the prices were up to $40,000 per square metre. More than 6500 people had registered interest and there were unconfirmed rumours that at least 500 had put down a $10,000 refundable deposit to secure an appointment where they could finalise the purchase. There were only 159 apartments available. Strong interest: Potential buyers at the launch. Photo: Jacky Ghossein But when Domain witnessed buyers streaming through the door at 8am to tables of waiting sales agents and conveyancers, there were no tantrums or tears. Lend Lease’s Barangaroo South managing director Andrew Wilson said there were no surprises for buyers on Saturday. “There’s been a lot of planning,” he said. “There’s been three or four weeks of our customers coming in looking at the apartments [in the display suite], looking through plans … by today most of our customers know exactly what they want and the prices they want to pay.” Buyers had been asked to nominate three apartments they were interested in, which perhaps minimised disappointment. At the front of the queue were buyers who had bought in previous Lend Lease developments and were in a loyalty program. Arriving at their allocated time, groups of about 20 at a time were allowed entry to the display suite on top of the Macquarie Bank offices in Shelley Street for a transaction that took, on average, 20 minutes. The display suite is right next door to the Barangaroo construction site. The first buyers to arrive in the suite were a well-dressed couple who live at Walsh Bay that own about 40 apartments around the CBD. They bought a couple of two-bedroom apartments. Another buyer, the Sydney property developer, Andrew Richardson, snapped up two apartments – a one bedder and two-bedder in Anadara’s Cloud priced at $2.5 million and $3 million. “The combination of the best site in Sydney and the extraordinary design of the whole precinct I think makes it a great investment and a good place to live,” Mr Richardson said. The penthouse, which had four buyers interested in it including several off-shore, had sold by 9am. CBRE Residential chairman Justin Brown said it was unusual for the penthouse to sell on launch day. “He realises this is a trophy property … this gentleman whose family came here today to sign the contract has followed the process for some time,” Mr Brown said. The buyer intends to return to live in the apartment, which will will be complete by late 2015.

Pomona West Apartments Talks on the Giant Step from Dorm Room to Apartment

Though we’ve seen ingenious solutions for making a tiny floor plan work, the challenge has been in finding furniture to fit in the space. Especially couches, which seem to mainly come in “McMansion”-friendly sizes. There is a solution, though. Many manufacturers have gotten in the game of making furnishings specifically for small spaces. We’re not talking about futons (though those are still available to those who want to relive their college years), but stylish pieces with the right proportions. Here’s a selection of our favorite couches for small apartments: UNDER $1000 This cushy option would fit nearly any decor style, from modern to retro. If you like it, act quick… it’s on sale now . OVER $1000 The Manchester Apartment Sofa, by Ballard Designs Another option that’s on the “investment” end of the spectrum (at a starting price of $1299 ), this will be the sofa you can use for years to come. Ballard has very high quality standards for their upholstered pieces, and give you plenty of options for customization. Even if you move into a bigger home, you will find a use for this sofa. Have something to say? Check out HuffPost Home on Twitter , Facebook , Pinterest, Tumblr and Instagram . ** Do you have a home story idea or tip? Email us at [email protected] (PR pitches sent to this address will be ignored.) Loading Slideshow Asami This couch by Colico is equipped with LED lights that change colors when desired. (Colico photo) Caterpillar Sectional This sofa was actually designed in 1972 by Parnian and continues to be a top seller for the company. Each section is attached to the adjacent pieces with a zipper, so it can fit practically any space. (Parnian photo) Concrete Chesterfield When we think of couches, we think of comfort. So, it’s hard for us to imagine relaxing on this concrete one by Gray Concrete. But it definitely looks cool for outdoor setting. (Gray Concrete photo) Europa This looks more like a sculpture than a couch but that’s exactly what DRAENERT wanted. Made from steel, this is a truly innovative product. (DRAENERT photo) Colosseum If you can’t make the trip to Rome, you may consider buying this Colosseum sofa. With 60 years of experience, Tappezzeria Rocchetti is bringing Italy to living rooms all over the world. (Tappezzeria Rocchetti photo) Tiger Sofa Rocchetti also created this very realistic tiger couch. Complete with incredible facial details and a tail, this is perfect for any safari-themed room. (Tappezzeria Rocchetti photo) Cat Tunnel Sofa If you’re a cat lover, this is for you. This sofa’s armrests and back are actually cat tunnels, so a furry friend can have fun while its owner is lounging. Watch the video above to see how designer Seungji Mun created this wonder. FlexibleLove This couch is flexible, to say the least. Designed by FlexibleLove, it is made from kraft paper and industrial wood waste, taking eco-friendly furniture to a whole new level. (FlexibleLove photo) Bocca Art can inspire lots of things, even furniture. These lips by Gufram were created with Salvador Dali’s The Face of Mae West painting in mind. There is another version of this couch by Heller. (Gugfram photo) Editor’s note: This slide has been updated to include other lip-sofa options. Contribute to this Story:

“The city acted in accordance with the law,” Hannon wrote in an emailed response to written questions from The Bee. She would not agree to an interview for this story. “Negotiations on this project took place over a matter of many months, with clear direction given to Nyhoff and myself by the (Redevelopment) Agency in closed session. Thereafter, those negotiations culminated in the agreement on the land purchase.” Hannon did not answer The Bee’s questions about what justification the city had for what it paid Draper and Cox for the land in 2009. The city had hired Modesto appraiser Gary N. Curtis in August 2008 to determine the property’s fair market value. City staff members instructed Curtis to value the property as if it already had been annexed into the city and rezoned for apartments, even though it was unincorpo-rated industrial land at the time. Curtis’ appraisal also was based on the assumption the land was contamination-free. To appraise the property, he used data from comparable vacant apartment land sales during 2006 and 2007 in Stanislaus County. Curtis determined that as of Aug. 16, 2008, Draper and Cox’s 6.46 acres were worth $3,118,350 and the church’s 1.84 acres were worth $881,650. That was $11.08 per square foot. In making his calculations, Curtis did not factor in any decline in market values from 2006 to 2008, despite the region’s collapsing residential real estate prices. Had Curtis ignored the peak-of-the- market 2006 land sales and used land sales only from 2007 and early 2008 for his comparisons, the Carver Road property’s mid-2008 appraised value likely would have been about $9.25 per square foot. That would have put the value of Draper and Cox’s land at $2.6 million and the church property at about $741,000. Had the city obtained a fresh appraisal in early 2009, comparable apartment land sales likely would have shown the property’s value was even lower. The Bee found four comparable sales of vacant land zoned for apartments between January 2007 and January 2009 that city officials could have considered in spring 2009 to determine the fair market value of the Carver Road properties. Had the city paid Draper and Cox a price similar to what those four parcels sold for and not paid the investors extra money to avoid a lawsuit or to extend their contract, taxpayers could have saved more than $1.36 million. Not doing so added $17,900 to the cost of each Archway Commons apartment. “I don’t know if those (land) comps were available to us at the time,” Marsh said. “Those weren’t the calculations that were given to us.” Curtis lost his appraiser’s license in 2011 because of alleged violations involving other appraisals. But if Curtis’ appraisal for the city had any flaws in it, ultimately that did not matter because city officials ended up ignoring his appraised values. Instead, all seven Modesto council members decided to pay Draper and Cox $12.48 per square foot or $3.5 million plus an additional $460,420 for a total $14.07 per square foot. And they decided to pay the church $5.99 per square foot or $480,000. ‘Take it or leave it’ Why were Draper and Cox paid so much? “In real estate, property is worth what people are willing to pay for it,” said Councilman Joe Muratore. City officials tried to get Draper to lower his price, Muratore recalled, but “he stuck to his guns, said take it or leave it, and the city took it.” Muratore wasn’t elected to the council until after the land was purchased, but he was involved in the deal because he worked for Draper during 2006 through 2008. Muratore currently is a partner in a couple of companies with Ryan Swehla. In late 2006, Swehla worked as a consultant for EAH Housing, which was looking for Modesto land on which to build government-subsidized apartments. Questions have been raised about the timing of Draper and Cox’s March 2007 purchase of the Carver Road property. One day after they bought that land for $2.8 million, EAH notified Modesto officials it wanted to buy the property for Archway Commons. EAH ultimately planned to use taxpayer funds to pay for that land. “It wasn’t nefarious or unethical,” Muratore said of his boss’s 2007 land purchase. “It was a clean transaction.” As Muratore remembers it, he and his childhood friend Swehla “were sitting in a coffee shop” when “this idea popped up” about EAH building its apartments near Ninth and Carver. LLC had option to buy Muratore said Draper and Cox already had an option to buy that land from its owners, the W.L. and S.E. Sweeley Trust. Muratore said Draper was looking for suggestions on what could be done with that land, so he told his boss about the EAH project. “I do remember (Draper) meeting with the city in advance to talk about the feasibility” of putting the EAH apartments on that site, Muratore said. He said those conversations were before Cox and Draper’s 4701 Stoddard LLC bought the land. Muratore said he did not get any commission or bonus for helping with that land deal. Swehla said he didn’t get any extra commission or bonus from the land transaction, either. He also defends the deal. “We knew this was the best, most suitable and cost-effective site available within (Modesto Redevelopment Agency boundaries),” Swehla said. Several other sites were considered, but “we kept coming back to the Ninth and Carver site for several reasons.” By choosing that previously unattractive site next to Highway 99, Swehla said Archway Commons is helping “bring about real redevelopment and revitalization.” He said the apartments will improve Modesto’s image because they can be seen from the highway, which is traveled by more than 120,000 vehicles a day. Swehla also defended the price Draper and Cox received for their land. His accounting of the 2009 land deal differs from what city officials say happened. “The price paid was not way above market at the time, but it was negotiated near the peak of the market,” Swehla wrote in an emailed response to The Bee’s questions.

Barangaroo apartments sell out

PHOTO: AFP/FILE ISLAMABAD: As the government is about to start the 2013 Hajj operation, tens of thousands of pilgrims are quite worried because the hired lodgings are quite far from the Haram Sharif. In fact, they are so far away that each pilgrim will have to bear an extra expenditure of SR1,100-1,300 in fares, The Express Tribune has learnt. Of the total 86, 869 pilgrims, over 40, 000 have been allotted lodgings that have been procured at a distant place called Azizia. From there, they will have to travel some eight to nine kilometres to Haram Sharif every day, incurring an extra cost on bus fares, officials of Religious Affairs Ministry said. One of Pakistans most outspoken political leaders, Sheikh Rashid Ahmed, who heads the Awami Muslim League (AML), recently visited the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and sought the details from the ministry concerned, said he smelled billions of rupees worth of corruption in Hajj 2013 arrangements. Itll be the biggest corruption scandal, bigger than the 2010 Hajj scam. Ill go to the court if it takes notice of this issue, the AML chief said. Itll be a serious problem for the Hujjaj who would be paying SR 40-50 extra on fares every day, he added. Some 100 of the 122 buildings acquired are located in Aizizia, a place some nine to ten kilometers away from Makkahs Holy Haram Mosque and the Kaaba, unnamed officials engaged with the arrangements said, This is the same place where tens of thousands of Pakistan pilgrims faced lots of troubles in 2010, he added. Pakistan will pay SR187 million for these buildings, they said, adding that a total of 247 million Saudi riyals would be paid for all the buildings hired for 86, 869 Hujjaj this year. Pakistan has already paid SR128.9 million as the rent for these buildings, they added. The Pakistan Hajj Mission has hired a big building owned by Abdul Rahman Nasir in Azizia, at a rent of SR2,700 per month. This building is some ten kilometre away from the Holy Mosque. The mission also paid SR438,750 in advance to the owner who is charging SR270, 000 per month for another ten buildings located some eight to nine kilometre from the Haram Sharif, sources said. Two more buildings in Azizia, owned by Hani Ibrahim Bashara, are nine kilometre away and the rent Pakistan Hajj Mission in Jeddah will pay is SR4,800 per month. Seven buildings, whose rent is SR29,400 per month, are also located some eight to nine kilometre from the Kaabah. Director General Hajj Jeddah, Syed Abu Ahmad Akif, who made the deal, acquired a big building owned by Hamood Ibrahim Hamood for SR963,750. This building, in Aizizia, is nine kilometres from the mosque. To take up the issue of hired buildings fresno property management rates, Minister for Religious Affairs Sardar Yousaf visited Saudi Arabia recently and cancelled contracts of two buildings in Jabal-e-Nur location, added the officials. He ordered the Hajj director general at Jeddah to take immediate steps to resolve the issue, officials said. Former Minister for Religious Affairs Hamid Saeed Kazmi, the major role-player in the 2010 Hajj scam, observed that the rates of recently hired apartments in Aizizia are twice as much as those in 2010. He, however, did not comment further on this issue. Former Federal Minister Syed Khursheed Shah, who was involved in Hajj 2013 arrangements, said the apartments were hired when the PPP government had completed its tenure. Shah put all responsibility on the DG Hajj. Abu Ahmad Akif could be responsible, if the hired buildings are located too far away from the Haram Sharif or for any possible misappropriation, he told The Express Tribune. However, the ministrys spokesperson Shahzad Ahmed defended the step. The accommodations for pilgrims are located at suitable places and hired on market price in the area, he said, adding that arrangements for extra buses for picking and dropping the pilgrims would be made soon. No complaint has been received from any pilgrim so far and I do not see any misappropriation in the hiring process of buildings, he added. The government has already received Rs25.4 billion from intending pilgrims who have deposited the amount in the scheduled banks months ago. Interestingly, the banks will pay a hefty sum of Rs310 million to the Ministry of Religious Affairs in interest.