Posted on

is marijuana seeds illegal

Marijuana

Marijuana refers to the dried leaves, flowers, stems, and seeds from the Cannabis sativa or Cannabis indica plant. The plant contains the mind-altering chemical delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other related compounds. THC acts on specific brain cell receptors that ordinarily react to natural THC-like chemicals. The amount of THC in marijuana has been increasing in recent decades, and may put users at a higher risk for addiction. Extracts can also be made from the cannabis plant. Marijuana can be smoked, vaporized and inhaled, or mixed into food known as “edibles”. A newly popular method of use is smoking or eating different forms of THC-rich resins. Smoking these THC-rich (as high as 95% THC) resins is known as dabbing. These extracts come in various forms such as:

  • hash oil or honey oil—a gooey liquid
  • wax or budder—a soft solid, like lip balm
  • shatter—a hard, amber-colored solid

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States. 1 According to the 2020 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 49.6 million Americans misused marijuana in the past year. Its use is more prevalent among yound adults, with the percentage of people who used marijuana in the past year being highest among young adults aged 18 to 25 (34.5%) compared with 16.3% of adults aged 26 or older and 10.1% of adolescents aged 12 to 17.

Physical Signs
  • Confusion
  • Lethargy
  • Difficulty with thinking and problem solving
  • Poor muscle and limb coordination
  • Red, glassy eyes
  • Delayed reaction times and abilities
Other Signs
  • Decreased involvement or interest in usual activities
  • Increased hunger
  • Misjudging time
  • Drop in academic performance
  • Distinct strong smell, different from tobacco
Health Consequences
  • Hallucinations, delusions, psychosis (when taken in high doses)
  • Paranoia
  • Addiction (approx. 1 in 10 users)
  • Breathing problems—greater risk of bronchitis, cough, and phlegm production
Resources

Resources for Prevention Providers

Resources for Parents & Caregivers

  • Parent Infographic – Do you know about marijuana? Talk with your kids about the facts
  • Parent Brochure – Talking with your child about marijuana: Keeping your kids safe
  • Partnership to End Addiction – Marijuana: What you need to know to help protect children, teens, and young adults

Fact Sheets

The term medical marijuana refers to using the whole, unprocessed marijuana plant or its basic extracts to treat symptoms of illness and other conditions. To date, the FDA has not approved a marketing application for cannabis for the treatment of any disease or condition. The FDA has, however, approved one cannabis-derived and three cannabis-related drug products. These approved products are only available with a prescription from a licensed healthcare provider.

The FDA has approved Epidiolex, which contains a purified form of the drug substance CBD for the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or Dravet syndrome in patients 1 years of age and older. It has also approved Epidiolex for the treatment of seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex in patients 1 year of age or older. That means FDA has concluded that this particular drug product is safe and effective for its intended use.

The agency also has approved Marinol and Syndros for therapeutic uses in the United States, including for the treatment of anorexia associated with weight loss in AIDS patients. Marinol and Syndros include the active ingredient dronabinol, a synthetic delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) which is considered the psychoactive component of cannabis. Another FDA-approved drug, Cesamet, contains the active ingredient nabilone, which has a chemical structure similar to THC and is synthetically derived.

See also  1 1 marijuana seeds

Policy

Marijuana is a Schedule I controlled substance under Idaho Law. It is illegal for any person to manufacture, deliver, possess with intent to manufacture or deliver, or possess marijuana, which refers to all parts of the plants of the genus cannabis, including or any preparation of cannabis which contains tetrahydrocannabinol. It is illegal to publically use or be under the influence of marijuana. Specific penalties for these acts can be found in Sections 37-2732 and 37-2732C of the Uniform Controlled Substances Act.

Recent Idaho Legislation
Possession By a Minor

2017: Senate Bill No. 1013
Repealed Idaho Code section 18-502C relating to possession of marijuana or drug paraphernalia by a minor, the use of controlled substances, and fines due to conflict with Idaho Code section 20-505 and in order to promote uniformity when charging juveniles for possession of marijuana. Enacted March 27, 2017.

Idaho Office of Drug Policy

Public Health Organizations

Prevention

Risk of drug use, including marijuana, greatly increases during times of transition. The transition from childhood to adolescence presents new and challenging social, family, and academic situations at the same time they may be exposed to substances like alcohol and marijuana for the first time. Early use of drugs increases a person’s chance of becoming addicted and alters the brain, therefore preventing early use is important. Prevention strategies for the prevention of marijuana use include enforcement of laws, maintain marijuana as a Schedule I substance, media campaigns targeting youth and adults, especially parents of youth, reducing youth exposure to marijuana advertising in states where it is legal, and implementation of evidenced-based prevention programs.

Avoid Unsupervised After-School Time

Students who participate in 1 or more days of supervised after-school activities are less likely to have ever used marijuana. After-school activities provide:

  1. Supervision by positive adult role models
  2. Youth leadership opportunities
  3. Incorporation of skills building
  4. A piece of a comprehensive prevention plan
Understand Risk and Protective Factors

Addressing risk factors early and paying careful attention to children at higher risk can reduce that child’s likelihood of a future problem. This is a simplified list of some overall risk factors. Learn more at youth.gov

  1. Family history of substance use disorders
  2. Mental health or behavioral issues
  3. Trauma
  4. Impulse control problems

Protective factors may reduce the risk of youth engaging in substance use. Increasing protective factors in addition to reducing risk factors can be more effective in preventing substance use.

Michigan Laws and Penalties

Under Michigan law marijuana is listed as a Schedule I controlled substance.

An adult may possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana; up to 15 grams of marijuana may be marijuana concentrate.

Within a residence, an adult may possess up to 10 ounces of marijuana and any marijuana produced by marijuana cultivated on the premises.

An adult who possesses more than 2.5 ounces of marijuana within a residence must store the excess amount in a secure container. Possession of more than 2.5 ounces of marijuana and up to 5.0 ounces of marijuana is a civil infraction punishable by a maximum fine of $500 and forfeiture of the marijuana for a first offense.

See also  black dominia fast marijuana seeds

Possession of more than 5.0 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor. No term of imprisonment will be imposed unless the possession involved violence or was “habitual, willful and for a commercial purpose.”

Possession in or within 1,000 feet of a park is either a felony or a misdemeanor, based on the judge’s discretion, and is punishable by a maximum of 2 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of $2,000.

  • Michigan Code Section 333.7212 Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.27955, Sec. 5.1 (a) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.27955, No. 1, Sec. 5.1 (b) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.2754, No. 1, Sec. 4.1 (i) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.27965, Sec 15.2(a) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.27955, No. 1, Sec 15.4 Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.7410a Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.7411 Web Search
Sale or Distribution

An adult may transfer up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana to another adult as long as there is no remuneration and the transfer is not advertised or promoted to the public. Distribution of less than 5 ounces without remuneration is a civil infraction with no incarceration possible and a maximum $500 fine.

The sale of less than 5 kilograms is a felony punishable by a maximum sentence of 4 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of $20,000.

The sale of 5 kilograms – 45 kilograms is a felony, which is punishable by a maximum sentence of 7 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of $500,000.

The sale of 45 kilograms or more is a felony, which is punishable by a maximum sentence of 15 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of $10,000,000.

  • Michigan Code Section 333.27955, Sec. 5.1 (d) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.7401(2)(d) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.7410 Web Search
Cultivation

An adult may grow up to 12 marijuana plants at the adult’s residence for personal use.

An adult may not grow marijuana plants “if the plants are visible from a public place” or if the plants are growing outside of a secure area. A violation of this section is punishable as a civil offense with a fine not to exceed $100 and forfeiture of the marijuana.

The cultivation of up to 24 plants for personal use is a civil infraction with no incarceration and maximum $500 fine.

The cultivation of 25 – 200 plants for personal use is a misdemeanor. A term of imprisonment may be imposed if “the violation was habitual, willfull, and for a commercial purpose or the violation involved violence.”

The cultivation of more than 200 plants for personal use is a misdemeanor. A term of imprisonment may be imposed if “the violation was habitual, willfull, and for a commercial purpose or the violation involved violence.”

  • Michigan Code Section 333.27955, Sec. 5.1(a) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.27954, Sec. 4.1 (f) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.27965, Sec. 15.1 Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.7401 Web Search
Hash & Concentrates

In Michigan, marijuana and hashish are punished in the same manner. The statutory definition of “marihuana” includes “all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of the plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant or its seeds or resin.” Hashish, hashish oil, and extracts clearly fall under this definition. Please see the marijuana penalties section for further details on Michigan’s criminal sanction on cannabis.

See also  cbc news alberta canada marijuana seeds

An adult may possess up to 15 grams of marijuana concentrate.

An adult may transfer up to 15 grams of marijuana concentrate to another adult as long as there is no remuneration and the transfer is not advertised or promoted to the public.

  • Michigan Code § 333.7106 Web Search
  • People v. Campbell, 72 Mich App. 411 249 N.W.2d 870 (1977). Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.27955, Sec. 5.1(a) Web Search
  • Michigan Code Section 333.27955, Sec. 5.1(b) Web Search
Paraphernalia

An adult may buy and use marijuana paraphernalia and may sell marijuana paraphernalia to another adult..

  • Michigan Code Section 333.27955, Sec. 5.2 Web Search
Miscellaneous

Any conviction will result in a driver’s license suspension for 6 months.

  • Michigan Code § 257.319e Web Search
Ann Arbor

In Ann Arbor, the penalty for being caught with marijuana is a $25 fine for the first offense, $50 for the second, and $100 for the third offense. Marijuana is not decriminalized on the University of Michigan’s campus.

More Information
Conditional Release

The state allows conditional release or alternative or diversion sentencing for people facing their first prosecutions. Usually, conditional release lets a person opt for probation rather than trial. After successfully completing probation, the individual’s criminal record does not reflect the charge.

Drugged Driving

Every state criminalizes driving under the influence of a controlled substance. Some jurisdictions also impose additional per se laws. In their strictest form, these laws forbid drivers from operating a motor vehicle if they have a detectable level of an illicit drug or drug metabolite (i.e., compounds produced from chemical changes of a drug in the body, but not necessarily psychoactive themselves) present in their bodily fluids above a specific, state-imposed threshold. Read further information about cannabinoids and their impact on psychomotor performance. Additional information regarding cannabinoids and proposed per se limits is available online.

EXPUNGEMENT

This state has enacted legislation explicitly providing the opportunity for those with marijuana convictions for activities that have since been decriminalized/legalized to have past marijuana convictions expunged, vacated, otherwise set aside, or sealed from public view.

Legalization

Generally, legalization means a policy that supports a legally controlled market for marijuana, where consumers can buy marijuana for personal use from a safe legal source.

LOCAL DECRIMINALIZATION

This state has local jurisdictions that have enacted municipal laws or resolutions either fully or partially decriminalizing minor cannabis possession offenses.

Medical Marijuana

This state has medical marijuana laws enacted. Modern research suggests that cannabis is a valuable aid in the treatment of a wide range of clinical applications. These include pain relief, nausea, spasticity, glaucoma, and movement disorders. Marijuana is also a powerful appetite stimulant and emerging research suggests that marijuana’s medicinal properties may protect the body against some types of malignant tumors, and are neuroprotective.