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germinating marijuana seeds in jiffy pellets

Jiffy in cannabis crops, all the information

One of the most popular products in Grow shops is jiffy, due to its low price, versatility and ease of use. But not everybody knows about the existence of these small objects, or many people do not know how to use them. For this reason we thought it would be appropriate to create this post, explaining what it is, how to use it and the advantages and disadvantages compared to other methods.

What is a jiffy ?

They are so called because they were commercialized by a company known as Jiffy Group and they are peat or coconut fiber that comes pressed and wrapped in a thin mesh. They have the shape of a small, cylindrical and flat disc which, when wet, swells up to multiply its size upwards, and contains a small hole at the top to introduce the seed or the stem of the cutting.

Its creator was an enthusiast of home-grown cabbages and other vegetables, but he did not like the way they sold the cuttings because of the lack of protection of the roots. It was for this reason that he began to develop individual seedlings that were easy to transplant, and thus the first Jiffy were born.

Image of jiffys where you can see 4 as they are sold and one already hydrated*

Jiffy Pellet Sizes

They are available in different dimensions: 24 mm. (0.94 inches), 33 mm. (1.3 inches ), 41 mm. (1.6 inches) and 70 mm. (2.75 inches). Although the most used are the 41 mm. (1.6 inches) ones. They usually come in boxes of 2000 units, but luckily stores can sell you the exact number you need and at a very good price.

Are these peat or coconut discs organic and biodegradable ?

They are totally organic and biodegradable, it is the same peat used in commercial substrates, natural. Just as with the coconut fibre, this type of jiffy was released more recently for those who love growing on this substrate, but it is made up of the same fibres that are used in coconut bricks. Even the small mesh it uses is biodegradable in a very short time, so it can be considered that jiffy will leave no trace on the planet after its use.

What are the advantages of using it ?

  • More economical than any pot
  • You can germinate many seeds in very little space
  • Makes transplantation much easier
  • Keeps humidity for a long time

How to use Jiffy pellets for germination or cutting

  1. First prepare a bucket with the nutrient solution, in this case clean water and root stimulator, with the pH lowered to 6.0 and a little bit of micro life
  2. Insert the jiffy pellets so that they are immersed in the nutrient solution
  3. Wait for them to hydrate and swell, usually no longer than 10 minutes
  4. Take the jiffy pellets out of the bucket one by one and and drain it a bit to let go the excess of liquid
  5. Place them in an upright position on a tray, with the hole facing upwards, and insert a stick or similar through the hole to make it easier for the seed or stem of the clone to enter
  6. Carefully insert the seed 0.4 inches (1 centimetre), or the stem of the cutting until at least one knot is buried
  7. Wait several days until you see the roots coming out of the mesh. If it’s a seed, as soon as you see the radicles popping up transplant it. With a cutting, wait until you see quite a few roots on the outside

Infographics representing how to use a jiffy pellet*

Transplanting from Jiffy Pellets

It is very simple, in fact it is designed to facilitate the transplant among other things. The best thing is that you don’t have to take the plant out of the jiffy to put it in a pot, as is the case when transplanting cannabis from one pot to another.

In this case it is only necessary to prepare the pot where we are going to put it, to add substrate until filling up a 75% approximately, to introduce the jiffy with the plant and to add more substrate until burying all the jiffy and part of the stem.

Tips for use

The small jiffy pellets, of 24 mm. (0.94 inches) and 33 mm. (1.3 inches), are more intended for cuttings than for seed germination. This is because due to their small space the roots appear very quickly and in addition a better aeration is achieved when many clones are placed in the same tray.

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On the other hand, when germinating seeds it is better for us that the jiffy is a little bigger, the 41 mm. (1.6 inches) one is perfect, because it contains more food and keeps humidity longer. The worst thing that can happen to them is that they get too dry, because then it takes a lot of time to rehydrate them.

✅ Can you use Jiffy pellets for hydroponics ?

It is not ideal, since this system needs a great aeration in the roots and jiffy does not allow this, at least at the base of the stem, so it can get to form fungi, although it would not be the first time we see it.

In this case it is much more interesting to use small grid pots with arlita to germinate and then place them in the hydroponic system. Another option is to use rockwool slabs, which allow for greater oxygenation, although we’re still sticking with the hydroponics grid pots.

Photograph of a hydroponic crop with rock wool*

Rock wool Vs Jiffy Pellets

Rock wool slabs have certain advantages as we saw before, but they have the disadvantage of being an inert material, so they need food from the first watering. Jiffy, on the other hand, contains pressed peat, which contains food for a few days, although it is always good to add root stimulator. Both are quite cheap, but it’s still cheaper to use a pressed peat or coconut pellet.

⚠️ Conclusion

A Jiffy pellet makes the job much easier for us cannabis growers and for its price it really pays off. If you have not tried them yet, I invite you to do so, because afterwards you may not want anything else to germinate, and especially to root your favorite clones. If you liked this post or think it could be useful for some other people, please share it.

How To Germinate Marijuana Seeds With Jiffy Pellets

My favorite way to germinate marijuana seeds is with jiffy pellets. I currently have a 100% germination rate using jiffy pellets!

Using jiffy pellets is a very safe and easy way to germinate your marijuana seeds. There are only a few steps, which I will go over here in detail.

You can find jiffy pellets and almost every garden store, or you can order them here. (Of course I always order them online because I am a lazy stoner.)

They come dry and compressed. We will need to add water to them so they expand and become usable for planting.

You should NOT soak the jiffy pellets. They will become too wet and if you squeeze them out they can become unstable.

Instead, we need to slowly pour 1 cup of water over them. Then wait several minutes until they expand.

Once the jiffy pellets have expanded, we can plant our marijuana seeds.

It is very important to only put one marijuana seed per jiffy pellet.

Take one of your seeds and put it about .5″ deep in the pellet. It does not matter which way the seed is turned. Cover it with some of the top soil.

If you have a jiffy pellet kit with a dome, place that over the top. Marijuana seeds need a relatively humid environment to germinate, and the dome will help with that. Just make sure to take it off a few times per day so the seeds can get fresh air.

It will take the seeds a few days to germinate. It is very important to make sure that they jiffy pellets do not dry out during this time.

The ideal temperature marijuana seed germination is 70°-78°, so try to keep the jiffy pellets in an environment that can accommodate that.

Anywhere from 2-8 days later, you will see your marijuana seeds begin to pop their heads out of the jiffy pellets. This will not happen to all your seeds at one time, so be patient and do not mess with the ones that need a little extra time.

Once the seeds have broken through the soil, they will need to be placed on either a 24/0 or 16/8 light schedule to start the germination phase.

Good luck with germinating your marijuana seeds with jiffy pellets! If you have any questions, please feel free to ask in the comments below.

Germinating Cannabis Marijuana Seeds

Much controversy surrounds the raising of cannabis seed. Many first time growers are bombarded with advice, often conflicting, on how exactly this should be done; however, it need not be such a complicated task. Cannabis seed is simple to grow, and if fresh, 90-100% germination rates are not unusual.

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The ‘Kiwiland Method’ for raising seed, has been developed from professional horticultural practices used the world over. We use it because it works, and it’s simple.

Table of contents

Needed equipment

The list below is standard equipment recommended by Kiwiseeds and assumes you already have the necessary grow space and lighting set up. If you haven’t already got your equipment you can buy that online at https://www.kiwiland.com/

1. Propagator with bottom heat or
2. Heat pad + seed-tray
3. Thermostat controller
4. Soil thermometer
5. Perlite

6. Large jiffy pots + seed-raising mix or
7. Rockwool starter blocks
8. Fine sprayer
9. Identification labels

Perlite preparation

Wet thoroughly enough perlite to cover the bottom
of the propagator approximately 2cm deep. Plug the propagator, or heat pad, into the thermostat controller, plug the controller into the power and set for 23 C. Place the heat-sensing probe into the wet perlite just beneath where the seedlings roots will be. If using a heating pad lay it out beneath the propagator tray.

Jiffy pots preparation

Pre-soak the jiffy pots in warm water then fill them to the top with seed-raising mix making sure to take out any bigger pieces that may obstruct the young shoot as it emerges.

(This can also be done with the help of a coarse sieve if you like.)

Completely saturate the jiffy-pots and their contents, but allow them to drain well. Do this carefully so as not to wash the fine soil away. Top them up and repeat if the mix has sunken too much. It’s important to have them as full as possible to give the young roots plenty of room to grow for the week or two until they are potted on, and, because having a greater volume of the mix in the pots means they take longer to dry out under the warm lamp.

With a thin pointed object such as a pencil, make a small hole in the center of each jiffy-pot about twice the depth that the seed is long (This varies with strain, but 5-8mm deep should be sufficient. Often the mistake is made of planting seeds too deeply, and they rot before they see the light of day. To ensure this doesn’t happen, never sow seeds deeper than 1cm). If sowing more than one variety remember to prepare identification labels in advance and label them as you go to prevent mix-ups.

Put the cannabis seeds in Jiffy pots

Sow seeds directly into the holes, and cover with a little of the moist seed-raising mix from around it with the help of the pencil. Use a little more fine mix if needed. Some growers have the patience to sow seeds a certain way up, and this can be beneficial, especially with big seeds. If this is done place the seed, point up, ensuring the root can travel downwards with ease.

Watering the seeds

Using the mister bottle, spray the freshly covered seeds until the mix is damp. Don’t pour water onto the pots as this can wash away the mix and expose seeds.

Transfer jiffy-pots into pre-warmed propagator tray, and settle them in making sure the wet perlite surrounds the pots, getting right up between them. This ensures the pots stay moist until well after the seeds germinate, protecting the young roots from drying out.

Lighting, temperature & humidity

Set the tray under either fluorescent lighting or a low-wattage H.P.S. to keep the newly planted seeds warm. At this stage no light is necessary but warmth is important, and low light provides this without drying the pots out. An air temp of 20-22C is ideal, a degree or two lower than the soil temp (around 23C). Humidity if regulated can be set for around 60%.

Growing the cannabis seedlings

As soon as the seedlings have germinated they need light. The food store supplied by the seed itself has all but been used up, and the plant needs light to photosynthesize and grow.

When growing marijuana in the vegetative stage you may choose how long you wish to keep the lights on, as long as it’s 18 hours or more. The advantages are that plants will grow faster with 24 hours light, and a constant temperature is easier to maintain this way, something hugely beneficial to young seedlings. Disadvantages are that you’ll need to water more, of course, your lamps and ballasts don’t get a break, and the electricity bill increases.

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Some people advise keeping young seedlings under fluorescent lighting for a while but this doesn’t provide them with the correct spectrum for photosynthesis. It is best in our opinion to place seedlings directly under low wattage H.P.S lamps, 150/250/ or 400 watts, at a good distance away.
Once the plants are a few days growing they need to be moved closer to the lamps in order to prevent stretching. Move them as close to the lamp as the tops of many plants would be comfortable. (30-60cm depending on the lamp size.)

Make sure a breeze (oscillating fan) is blowing over the young plants, primarily so they don’t overheat, but furthermore to help strengthen delicate stems by stimulating cellulose production. Spindly stems cannot support heavy flowering growth. The importance of your internal air circulation cannot be stressed enough. It will exercise your plants and make them grow stronger while reducing many hazards that could ruin your crop.

Now that the plants have strong light they require more water and nutrients as well. A light organic feed or nutrient solution starting with an E.C of no more than .8 (with the water already at .5) can be sprayed directly on the plant and watered into the soil. The seed-raising mix contains no nutrients so within a few days the plants will be hungry.

Young seedlings love humidity, and a constant 60-70% is ideal at this stage. Use a cheap mister bottle, and spray regularly freshwater (ph- 6.5-7.5) over the leaves. This increases humidity, and washes dirt and dust off the leaf surface, unclogging stomata and enabling the plant to breathe properly. In natural conditions, the rain would do this for us.

Problems raising seedlings

Problems can occur during germination. Here is a list of some of the more common reasons why your seeds may not be doing so well.

Too wet
Seeds need to be damp, not wet for germination. Excess water prevents oxygen from getting to the seed. Poorly drained soils may also cause soil fungus diseases. The condition of wet soils may be improved by adding perlite, which will aerate your soil. Make sure any trays or pots you use have holes in the bottom to let the excess water drain.

Too dry
A certain amount of water is essential for germination, so maintaining constant soil moisture during the germination period is vital. Spray the soil surface with a fine mist, or cover containers with glass or a damp cloth to prevent your soil drying out. Make sure you remove the cloth once the shoot emerges.

Too hot
High temperatures result in excessive soil desiccation and injury to seeds and seedlings. We recommend a constant temp of 20-25 degrees.

Too cold
Cold temperatures can kill seedlings and prevent germination. Cool temperatures can result in slow, uneven germination, and attack by soil diseases. If growing outside, you may want to start your seeds indoors, before outdoor planting. Make sure planting is not done too early when there is still a chance of frost.

Too shallow
If you sow your seeds too shallowly the seeds can dry out. A depth of between .5 to 1cm is about right.

Soil too firm
Making your soil mix too firm can prevent oxygen from getting to your seeds and drainage can be affected. Pat freshly covered seeds lightly with your fingers.

Soil too loose
Soil that’s too loose results in too much air surrounding the seed. Seeds planted in this manner will not absorb moisture properly, and it’s likely they’ll dry out. Cover freshly sown seeds with fine mix and pat down lightly with your fingers.

Soil fungus
Seeds may rot, or the young seedlings may fall over. Overwatering, poor drainage and lack of aeration will increase the likelihood of this occurring. Plant seeds in sterilized potting mix, and make sure your containers are clean.

Non-viable seed
If your seeds have not been stored correctly they can deteriorate. Look for darker seeds that are a little bigger, without cracks or chips. Any seeds that look shriveled or wrinkled should be discarded, as this means the seed has dehydrated and is dead.